formal system

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formal system

n
(Logic) logic an uninterpreted symbolic system whose syntax is precisely defined, and on which a relation of deducibility is defined in purely syntactic terms; a logistic system. Also called: formal theory or formal calculus Compare formal language
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He covers formal theory on the subject (meta-physics); the greater logics: the transcendental, the object, and relation; the four forms of change; the theory of points; what a body is; and what it is to live.
Jazz Piano Basics Book 2 brings formal theory into the patterns and sounds experienced in Book 1.
Hobbs (Chief Scientist for Natural Language Processing, Information Sciences Institute, and a Research Professor, University of Southern California) "A Formal Theory of Commonsense Psychology: How People Think People Think" provides a large-scale logical formalization of commonsense psychology in support of humanlike artificial intelligence.
However, formal theory development began in 1973 with Chase and Simon (1973) who observed that experts are different cognitively, specifically in how they process information.
Aldrich is a follower of the rational choice "formal theory," which develops Downs's theory of economic interest so as to determine the path of rational pursuit of one's interest, regardless of its content.
Also absent is Wroe Alderson and Miles Martin's classic, "Toward a Formal Theory of Transactions and Transvections," which represents an early example of rigorous theorizing on the movement of goods and information.
For clinicians, many are mystified by theoretical models, a problem that has recently been addressed and an argument is made for the use of formal theory in practice over use of 'common sense' to guide implementation.
I understand part of this dilemma as relating to whether we are talking about formal theory or local theory.
Formal theory either did not exist for a particular idea, or more than one idea or perspective seemed to exist.
More specifically, Reason and Kimball suggested that when developing programs or planning interventions student affairs professionals should (a) systematically consider and adopt relevant scholarly knowledge [which they call formal theory]; (b) generate a nuanced understanding of their work environment and the student populations with whom they work [institutional context]; (c) parse, and if necessary reconstruct, selected formal theories to better fit the environment within which the theory will be applied using their own experiences as a guide [informal theory]; (d) and adopt intentional developmental interventions that are consistent with their understanding of formal theory, institutional context, and informal theory [practice].

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