Fosbury flop


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Fosbury flop

(ˈfɒzbərɪ; -brɪ)
n
(Athletics (Track & Field)) athletics a modern high-jumping technique whereby the jumper clears the bar headfirst and backwards
[C20: named after Dick Fosbury (born 1947), US winner of men's high jump at Mexico Olympics in 1968, who perfected the technique]

Fosbury flop

The modern style of high jumping in which an athlete jumps head first over a bar, with their back to the bar.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Fosbury flop - jumping over the bar backwards and head first
high jump - the act of jumping as high as possible over a horizontal bar
Translations

Fosbury flop

[ˈfɒzbərɪˌflɒp] N (Sport) → fosbury-flop m

Fosbury flop

nFosburyflop m
References in periodicals archive ?
I'm not that good at the Fosbury Flop so I have a lot of points to work on.
Ayew's Fosbury flop under England defender Harry Maguire's negligible escort was pathetic - although referee Martin Atkinson did not admonish him with a yellow card.
Everyone today uses the Fosbury Flop, though most jumpers have no clue the backwards-over-the-bar style actually had a start point - April 20, 1963, in Grants Pass - and no clue who Dick Fosbury is.
The story of the Fosbury flop is a staple in books, presentations, and talks about breakthrough innovation.
IT'S the most famous leap in the air since the Fosbury Flop - and we could well see it again at Newbury today.
Mariyappan completed the Fosbury flop action in a clear motion.
Nevertheless, it was also excluded from the sample: it is true that the ellipsis does occur in English, but the form Fosbury flop is still widely found.
Along with this there may be innovations like the Fosbury Flop in high jumping that affect superior performance.
Barsham, who jumps off his left foot using the Fosbury Flop technique, left his mark on the London Olympics when he cleared a height of 2.
It's now set to become the Fosbury Flop of housework.
Another example also includes American athlete Dick Fosbury, who won the gold medal in the 1968 Summer Olympics and drew the world's attention to his innovative high jump style known as Fosbury Flop.
What Celtic WANT to hear is: "I turned round, saw Broadfoot giving it the full Fosbury flop and thought to myself: 'Gaun yersel big yin - that gives me the perfect opportunity to get it right up the Cellic.