Fosbury flop


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Fosbury flop

(ˈfɒzbərɪ; -brɪ)
n
(Athletics (Track & Field)) athletics a modern high-jumping technique whereby the jumper clears the bar headfirst and backwards
[C20: named after Dick Fosbury (born 1947), US winner of men's high jump at Mexico Olympics in 1968, who perfected the technique]

Fosbury flop

The modern style of high jumping in which an athlete jumps head first over a bar, with their back to the bar.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Fosbury flop - jumping over the bar backwards and head first
high jump - the act of jumping as high as possible over a horizontal bar
Translations

Fosbury flop

[ˈfɒzbərɪˌflɒp] N (Sport) → fosbury-flop m

Fosbury flop

nFosburyflop m
References in periodicals archive ?
From a moonsault off the top rope to a Fosbury Flop over it, the former New Japan startook the assault to Gargano and spent much of the bout on top.
"But on the Sunday, it rained nearly all day, and I can tell you that doing the Fosbury Flop onto a mat when it's wet through is not very pleasant."
"I'm not that good at the Fosbury Flop so I have a lot of points to work on.
Ayew's Fosbury flop under England defender Harry Maguire's negligible escort was pathetic - although referee Martin Atkinson did not admonish him with a yellow card.
The technique was controversial, but it was rapidly adopted in the wake of Fosbury's Olympic success; at the Munich Olympic Games in 1972, 28 of the 40 competitors used what was by then known as the "Fosbury flop." The story of the Fosbury flop is a staple in books, presentations, and talks about breakthrough innovation.
IT'S the most famous leap in the air since the Fosbury Flop - and we could well see it again at Newbury today.
Amongst the latter, the Fosbury flop tear [4] (B3 in the Ladermann subclassification) [3] is a newly described lesion which occurs from a full-thickness tear that has flipped upon itself [4].
In many of our lifetimes we have seen the dramatic performance changes resulting, in part, from the evolution in technique from scissors, western roll, straddle, and currently, the Fosbury Flop. Ms.
Mariyappan completed the Fosbury flop action in a clear motion.
Similarly, Fosbury flop, according to the DEA, is also a false Anglicism because it is now obsolete and "flop" is preferred.