Foughten

Fought´en


p. p.1.p. p. of Fight.
References in classic literature ?
Each dint upon his batter'd shield Was token of a foughten field; And thus, beneath his lady's bower, He sung as fell the twilight hour:
Now Night her course began, and over Heav'n Inducing darkness, grateful truce impos'd, And silence on the odious dinn of Warr: Under her Cloudie covert both retir'd, Victor and Vanquisht: on the foughten field MICHAEL and his Angels prevalent Encamping, plac'd in Guard thir Watches round, Cherubic waving fires: on th' other part SATAN with his rebellious disappeerd, Far in the dark dislodg'd, and void of rest, His Potentates to Councel call'd by night; And in the midst thus undismai'd began.
Indeed, his claim in act 5 that "Hell and Elysium swarm with ghosts of men / That I have sent from sundry foughten fields / To spread my fame through hell and up to heaven," points to his hope for an immortal renown based on his ability to create death (1 Tam, 5.1.465-67).
after this spousage the kynges frendes fell from hym, bothe in Englande and in Fraunce, the Lordes of his realme, fell in division emongest themselfes, the commons rebelled against their sovereigne Lorde, and naturall Prince, wer foughten, many thousands slain, and finally, the kyng deposed, and his sonne slain, and this Quene sent home again, with as muche misery and sorowe, as she was received with pompe and triumphe.
Millions of souls sit on the banks of Styx, Waiting the back return of Charon's boat; Hell and Elysium swarm with ghosts of men That I have sent from sundry foughten fields To spreadmy fame through hell and up to heaven.
thou arte the very knyght the whiche hath made the felde and foughten valyauntly and borne awaye the vyctory agaynste the greate and myghty puyssaunt and auncyent enemye of mankynd the deuyll of helle and hath brought agayne the prysoners the whiche were in his prison.
the so-called glide-development and the shift of the syllable boundary, of which the results are, e.g., [owx] < [ox] as in foughten or/ow/</o:/ + /w/ as in rowen (see Fisiak 1968: 49-55).