founder effect

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Related to Founder effects: Founder principle, Founder event

founder effect

n.
A random difference in allele frequencies of a population founded by a small group of organisms relative to the allele frequencies in the original population.
References in periodicals archive ?
All of these groups have estimated founder effects about 10 times as strong as those of Finns, which suggests the South Asian groups have "just as many, or more, recessive diseases," said Reich.
In the Mexican population, the possibility of two independent founder effects has been suggested, since the [(GCG).sub.11][(GCA).sub.3]GCG (or [(GCN).sub.15]) and [(GCG).sub.9] or [(GCN).sub.13] mutant alleles both occurred in the investigated patients.
Some studies indicate that the average coancestry is a good measure of genetic diversity because it accounts for both founder effects and the effects of genetic drift (Lacy, 1995; Meuwissen, 1997; Caballero and Toro, 2000).
The variability of the current population is the result of the contribution of few ancestors, who are mostly also founders, evidencing that the population was developed from a narrow genetic base that characterizes the occurrence of founder effects. The small number of founder animals shows the need for reducing of inbreeding in studied herd by the introduction of animals that do not have direct relationship with the main ancestors.
You can end up with limited mating groups that have nothing to do with religion that have founder effects." Risch cites French-Canadians, for example, who are Catholic but who also carry Tay-Sachs disease--the result of endogamous behavior when the small group settled in Canada.
Exceptions occur where the frequencies of specific mutations are increased in a population because of founder effects, or where a mutation has been introduced on many occasions into a small isolated community [11, 12, 13, 14].
"More recent studies of Y chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA have pointed to founder effects of both Middle Eastern and local origin, yet, the issue of how to characterize Jewish people as mere coreligionists or as genetic isolates that may be closely or loosely related remained unresolved."
In sum, the results of this study suggest the importance of additional research into founder effects, board power dynamics, and the interrelationship between the two.
They are thought to account for over 80% of highly penetrant inherited breast cancer, and for about 2-3% of all breast cancer in outbred non-'founder' populations (in populations with so-called founder effects, mutations that are usually >400 years old are carried by a large proportion of the breast cancer population).
There are several founder effects for FH in South Africa