cardinal virtues

(redirected from Four Cardinal Virtues)
Related to Four Cardinal Virtues: Three Theological Virtues

cardinal virtues

pl n
(Philosophy) the most important moral qualities, traditionally justice, prudence, temperance, and fortitude
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Classically, justice was counted as one of the four cardinal virtues and at times, the most important one as John Bordley Rawls termed it 'the first virtue of social institutions'.
The virtue of fortitude, one of the four cardinal virtues, is very necessary for a genuine spiritual life.
This Fraternal Order was founded "To promote and practice the four cardinal virtues of Charity, Justice, Brotherly Love and Fidelity; to promote the welfare and enhance the happiness of its members; to quicken the spirit of American Patriotism and cultivate good fellowship."
Wrath responds to injustice and desires to restore rights (Pieper, Four Cardinal Virtues 194).
Thomas takes over Plato's four cardinal virtues. He believes that Plato and his school have exercised enormous influence for the good, and have contributed significantly to the development of Christian theology.
Among other things, Bourke discusses Aquinas' accounts of the four cardinal virtues (temperance, courage/fortitude, justice and prudence) and of the seven deadly sins--two of which are envy and anger/wrath.
When I finally read the German philosopher Josef Pieper's The Four Cardinal Virtues, which had sat unread on my shelf for years, I was shocked to learn that I didn't hate prudence; what I hated was its current - and incorrect - definition.
Plato resolves the dilemma by introducing the four cardinal virtues as the way to bring order and happiness to human life.
Notwithstanding his attempt to show how the four cardinal virtues are related in and through good conduct, they remain discrete.
However, one figure appears to be pouring from a jug into a cup and thus possesses the classical attributes of Temperance, one of the Four Cardinal Virtues. (4) A second figure can be tentatively identified from the Beard watercolour as possibly representing Fortitude.
(23) This has four subdivisions from which all obligations or duties stem, namely the four cardinal virtues expounded by Plato: wisdom, justice, courage, and temperance.
61) due to his claim that the four cardinal virtues in a sense "cover" all moral virtues (ST 1-2, q.