Fourier analysis

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Fourier analysis

n.
The branch of mathematics concerned with the approximation of periodic functions by the Fourier series and with generalizations of such approximations to a wider class of functions.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Fourier analysis

(ˈfʊərɪˌeɪ)
n
(Mathematics) the analysis of a periodic function into its simple sinusoidal or harmonic components, whose sum forms a Fourier series
[C19: named after Baron Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier (1768–1830), French mathematician, Egyptologist, and administrator]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Fou′rier anal`ysis


n.
the expression of any periodic function as a sum of sine and cosine functions, as in an electromagnetic wave function.
[1925–30; after J.B.J. Fourier]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Fourier analysis - analysis of a periodic function into a sum of simple sinusoidal components
analysis - a branch of mathematics involving calculus and the theory of limits; sequences and series and integration and differentiation
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Fourier-Analyse
References in periodicals archive ?
Structure of Hen Egg-White Lysozyme: A Three-Dimensional Fourier Synthesis at 2 A Resolution.
Structure of Hoemoglobin: A Three-Dimensional Fourier Synthesis at 5.5 A Resolution, Obtained by X-Ray Analysis.
This concept of constructing a complex sound out of sinusoidal terms is the basis for additive synthesis, also called as Fourier synthesis for the aforementioned reason.

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