declension

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declension

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de·clen·sion

 (dĭ-klĕn′shən)
n.
1. Linguistics
a. In certain languages, the inflection of nouns, pronouns, and adjectives with respect to categories such as case, number, and gender.
b. A class of words of one language with the same or a similar system of inflections, such as the first declension in Latin.
2. A descending slope; a descent.
3. A decline or decrease; deterioration: "States and empires have their periods of declension" (Laurence Sterne).
4. A deviation, as from a standard or practice.

[Middle English declenson, from Old French declinaison, from Latin dēclīnātiō, dēclīnātiōn-, grammatical declension, declination; see declination.]

de·clen′sion·al adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

declension

(dɪˈklɛnʃən)
n
1. (Grammar) grammar
a. the inflection of nouns, pronouns, or adjectives for case, number, and gender
b. the complete set of the inflections of such a word: "puella" is a first-declension noun in Latin.
2. a decline or deviation from a standard, belief, etc
3. a downward slope or bend
[C15: from Latin dēclīnātiō, literally: a bending aside, hence variation, inflection; see decline]
deˈclensional adj
deˈclensionally adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

de•clen•sion

(dɪˈklɛn ʃən)

n.
1.
a. the inflection of nouns, pronouns, and adjectives for categories such as case and number.
b. the whole set of inflected forms of such a word, or the recital thereof in a fixed order.
c. a class of such words having similar sets of inflected forms: the Latin second declension.
2. a bending, sloping, or moving downward.
3. deterioration; decline.
[1400–50; < Old French declinaison < Latin dēclīnātiō declination]
de•clen′sion•al, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

declension

An inflection or set of inflections for a noun, pronoun, or adjective.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.declension - the inflection of nouns and pronouns and adjectives in Indo-European languages
noun - the word class that can serve as the subject or object of a verb, the object of a preposition, or in apposition
inflection, inflexion - a change in the form of a word (usually by adding a suffix) to indicate a change in its grammatical function
2.declension - process of changing to an inferior state
decline, diminution - change toward something smaller or lower
drop-off, falling off, falloff, slump, slack - a noticeable deterioration in performance or quality; "the team went into a slump"; "a gradual slack in output"; "a drop-off in attendance"; "a falloff in quality"
3.declension - a downward slope or bend
downhill - the downward slope of a hill
incline, slope, side - an elevated geological formation; "he climbed the steep slope"; "the house was built on the side of a mountain"
steep - a steep place (as on a hill)
4.declension - a class of nouns or pronouns or adjectives in Indo-European languages having the same (or very similar) inflectional forms; "the first declension in Latin"
category, class, family - a collection of things sharing a common attribute; "there are two classes of detergents"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

declension

noun
Descent to a lower level or condition:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
deklinaceskloňování
taivutus
declinatio
declinare
sklanjatev

declension

[dɪˈklenʃən] N (Ling) → declinación f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

declension

n (Gram) → Deklination f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

declension

[dɪˈklɛnʃn] n (Gram) → declinazione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The class of nominals that combine a trochaic genitive singular and a consonant-final partitive singular can likewise be divided into third declension nominals like INIMENE 'person' with a consonant-final stem, as in inimest, and 'fourth declension' nominals like KONE 'speech' with a vowel-final stem, as in konet.
Estonian also contains assimilated loans of various kinds, which can either be treated as exceptional members of the classes in table 2, or else organized into a fourth declension with a minimal form inventory.
For instance, masculine and neuter nouns of the Latin second and fourth declensions usually fell into the OE a-declension (e.g., s(e)alm 'psalm', decan 'dean', engel 'angel', disc 'dish', win 'wine', etc., from Latin psalmus, decanus, discus, vinum); only few of them were integrated into the weak nouns (e.g., cristalla 'crystal', from Lat.

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