Foxe


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Foxe

 (fŏks), John 1516-1587.
English martyrologist whose Book of Martyrs (1563) includes graphic accounts of the persecution of Protestants during the reign of Mary I.

Foxe

(fɒks)
n
(Biography) John. 1516–87, English Protestant clergyman; author of History of the Acts and Monuments of the Church (1563), popularly known as the Book of Martyrs
References in periodicals archive ?
Cooper said it is medically unknown why Foxe crossed the centerline in her Toyota Echo while traveling west on Route 120, about 100 feet from Belle Court.
Franklin claims both James and Foxe have contributed to Canadian fiction and non-fiction, pointing out how early modern travel influenced such diverse writers and thinkers as Farley Mowat, Frank Rasky, and Northrop Frye, who famously claimed that depictions of the north created a "garrison mentality" in Canadians (lxxxix).
Foxe (1635, 117-118) opens his account of Button's voyage by stating:
As Margaret Aston and Elizabeth Ingram have written, the Book of Martyrs was "very much an illustrated text," with Foxe and publisher, John Day, including more than 100 woodcuts in the work, thus earning the distinction of having more illustrations than any other sixteenth-century English book, with the exception of Holinshed's Chronicles.
Two further essays on Foxe give fascinating accounts of the malleability and portability of the woodcut images in the Acts and Monuments.
Foxe said that further studies might result in advances in the understanding of ASD, and the communication abilities of individuals with autism by identifying the neural mechanisms that are at the root of these multisensory deficits.
Chapter 1, "The compilation of the book," opens with two claims: first, that Foxe is best viewed not as an author but as an author-compiler, tailoring existing manuscript and printed sources to the typographical and polemical aims of his larger narrative; and second, that the four editions printed in his lifetime consist "not of a single ever-expanding book, but of four distinctive constructions" (23), each exquisitely responsive to its own historical moment.
Evoking Foxe, Adelman explains how a new definition of sacred nationhood based on land boundaries replaces an older "Jewish" construction defined by blood and ancestry, but is also dangerously open to alterity.
The whole complex of issues that rotate around Foxe's martyrology is examined by John King in this learned, stimulating and handsomely produced study that is clearly the product of long familiarity with John Foxe, the reformed religious landscape, and the Elizabethan book trade.
King rightly points out that Foxe was not an autonomous author, but rather an "author-compiler" who worked with his publisher and many others to stitch together primary documents such as prisoners' narratives of their examinations and eyewitness accounts of executions.
In some prefatory remarks to the Pandectae locorum communium Foxe enquired: 'what can poets, what can historians, what can rhetoricians, and orators [.
Irish neuroscientist John Foxe claims a cup of cha is the best thing going for your brain.