Fraulein

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Fräu·lein

 (froi′līn′, frou′-)
n. pl. Fräulein Abbr. Frl.
1. Used as a courtesy title in a German-speaking area before the name of an unmarried woman or girl. See Usage Note at miss2.
2. fräulein Used as a form of polite address for a girl or young woman in a German-speaking area.
3. Chiefly British A German governess.

[German, diminutive of Frau, woman; see Frau.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Fräulein

(German ˈfrɔylain; English ˈfrɔːlaɪn; ˈfraʊ-)
n, pl -lein or English -leins
1. an unmarried German woman: formerly used as a title equivalent to Miss. Abbreviation: Frl
2. fraulein informal any young German woman
[from Middle High German vrouwelīn, diminutive of vrouwe lady]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Fräu•lein

(ˈfrɔɪ laɪn or, often, ˈfrɔ-, ˈfraʊ-)

n., pl. -leins, -lein.
the conventional German title of respect and term of address for an unmarried woman.
[1685–95; < German]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Fraulein - a German courtesy title or form of address for an unmarried woman
form of address, title of respect, title - an identifying appellation signifying status or function: e.g. `Mr.' or `General'; "the professor didn't like his friends to use his formal title"
German language, High German, German - the standard German language; developed historically from West Germanic
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even Albert Einstein acknowledged her work in a letter penned a few days after her death in which he said "Fraeulein Noether was the most significant creative mathematical genius thus far produced since the higher education of women began."
You'll meet the girls in the band; altercations between landlady Fraeulein Schneider and one of her tenants, Herr Schultz; and lots of other small vignettes that cast a light on what life was like during Weimar.