frame story

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frame story

n.
A narrative introducing or containing one or more other narratives that are the primary focus of the work as a whole.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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I suspect that Patwardhan gets his frame narrative from the Maharashtrian activist scene that he documents with such care in the first part of his film.
Like the fictional universe that they masterfully created since their debut in 2013, Love Yourself follows a frame narrative structure like the various literary references they have used through the years (a story within a story).
Jim narrates The Provider in flashback, with a frame narrative in 2085, a technique that removes suspense because readers know from the beginning that the power never returns.
One Thousand and One Nights, with its classic frame narrative of Scheherazade telling a new story night after night to stave off execution, synthesizes Indian, Persian, Iraqi, Syrian and Egyptian tales.
Artistic considerations, then, made an Arctic voyage the ideal frame narrative, echoing and amplifying the central setting, images, and themes of the novel.
Indeed, at another level, one could argue that the narrator's deep passion for Arsenal makes the club a sort of frame narrative that holds all the other narratives he performs.
As Nunez Rivera bears in mind, the traditional arrangement of a collection of novellas was typically modeled after the Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio's Decameron, a frame narrative containing several short stories that all maintain a common plotline or thread.
As he argues, this enabled Chesnutt to devise "a narrative framework that combines the advantages of a detached perspective with the immediacy of an eyewitness account" (Duncan 1998, 108).9 Werner Sollors takes this even further in suggesting that "Chesnutt is precisely the American writer who manages to sustain an ambivalence toward two groups in the drama he presents, in which he succeeded because of very carefully devised formal structures (including such features as a carefully balanced frame narrative opening up multiple ironies)" (2010, 7).
This claim rests upon a distinction between the two temporal orders present within AA: the first of which is the frame narrative that follows Quentin Compson during 1909 and 1910, and the second of which occurs some forty-plus years earlier and revolves around the Sutpen family.
While this treatment of Munday as a serious, historically aware dramatist rather than a theatrical hack is welcome, it does, however, involve a marginalizing of Robin Hood as merely a "device" (93) for the plays' exploration of John's kingship--a reading I find overstated given how insistently the frame narrative presents The Downfall of Robert Earl of Huntingdon as a play about Robin Hood.