douce

(redirected from Francis Douce)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

douce

(duːs)
adj
dialect Scot and Northern English quiet; sober; sedate
[C14: from Old French, feminine of dous, from Latin dulcis sweet]
ˈdoucely adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
English 18th-century antiquarians Alban Butler and Francis Douce, noting the obscurity of Saint Valentine's identity, suggested that Valentine's Day was created as an attempt to supersede the pagan holiday of Lupercalia.
RECENT CRITICISM HAS OFTEN PAIRED CHARLES LAMB'S "a complaint of the Decay of Beggars in the Metropolis," published in the character of Elia in the May 1822 issue of the London Magazine, with John Smith and Francis Douce's Vagabondiana.
with Portraits of the most Remarkable" announces deliberate control over selected material, even as it scrupulously refrains from using the term "beggar." The choice of "wanderer" over a word that makes a profession out of importunity, not to mention the emphasis on the book containing only selected material, helps Smith and his collaborator, the antiquarian Francis Douce, give a particularly charming turn to a normally grim aspect of contemporary life in the capital.
'To lament over a dead body is to manifest a love for the material [and] not the spiritual part of the deceased,' confided the British antiquarian and collector Francis Douce (1757-1834), in a private notebook labelled 'MAXIMS'.
Gillam (ed.), The Douce Legacy: An Exhibition to Commemorate the 150th Anniversary of the Bequest of Francis Douce (1757-1834), exh.
In this connection, the Bodleian Library's collections of broadside ballads, now digitized and available to view on the web, really ought to be mentioned, as ballads collected by Anthony Wood and Elias Ashmole (probably via John Aubrey) and, retrospectively, by Francis Douce, could provide readers with alternative editions of many of these songs--and as Lucie Skeaping admirably shows, in the world of the ballad, wit and variety are all.
(5) This design has not been articulated in previous descriptions of MS Douce 302: Catalogue of the Printed Books and Manuscripts Bequeathed by Francis Douce, Esq., to the Bodleian Library (Oxford, 1840), pp.
This book focuses on six men - Thomas Tyrwhitt, editor of Chaucer; George Tollet, country gentleman; Sir William Blackstone, distinguished lawyer; Thomas Holt White, retired ironmonger; Samuel Henley, translator of Vathek; and Francis Douce, Keeper of Manuscripts in the British Museum - who provided more than 1300 notes, some of them extended discussions of passages in the plays of the Renaissance dramatist.
Thomas Tyrwhitt was a creditable editor of Chaucer, Sir William Blackstone was Solicitor-General and author of an authoritative legal text, Samuel Henley translated Vathek, and Francis Douce was one of England's most redoubtable collectors of books for a public library (as well as consorting with political radicals, which this book never mentions).
These occur in a letter dated 13 September 1794 (65) from the antiquary Richard Twiss to Francis Douce, whose collection was to enrich the Bodleian Library.
George Cumberland tried on 21 January 1827 (454) to interest Francis Douce in them, but, as far as is known, without success (454).
As usual there is a loan exhibition from an institution: this time the Ashmolean is showing some of the magnificent early Northern engravings bequeathed to the University of Oxford in 1834 by Francis Douce, who collected principally because of his interest in imagery, for example, of witchcraft and the exotic.