Francis Galton


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Related to Francis Galton: Alfred Binet
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Noun1.Francis Galton - English scientist (cousin of Charles Darwin) who explored many fields including heredity, meteorology, statistics, psychology, and anthropologyFrancis Galton - English scientist (cousin of Charles Darwin) who explored many fields including heredity, meteorology, statistics, psychology, and anthropology; founder of eugenics and first to use fingerprints for identification (1822-1911)
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Francis Galton, Charles Darwin's equally brilliant cousin and one of the fathers of modern fingerprint analysis, speculated that the probability of two people having the same fingerprints was about two in 64 million.
1822: Francis Galton, founder of a new science called "eugenics", was born in Birmingham.
1822: Francis Galton (below), founder of a new science called "eugenics", was born in Birmingham.
A particularly thought-provoking map in chronicling how cartography provides wonderful insights into the past is by Francis Galton FRS.
Old boys include Francis Galton, Edward Burne-Jones, JRR Tolkien, Field Marshall Slim, Enoch Powell, Kenneth Tynan, two winners of the Nobel Prize, Bill Oddie, novelists Jonathan Coe and Lee Child, and the politician Lord Willetts.
The originator of the statistical approach that sociogenomicists use was Francis Galton, a cousin of Charles Darwin.
Darwin, by then too old to help himself, passed the information on to his cousin, Francis Galton, who in turn promised to do what he could to help but Faulds never heard from him.
Adam goes back to Francis Galton, a cousin of Darwin, who coined the word "eugenics"; to Alfred Binet, inventor of the first intelligence test for children based on "mental age"; and to Charles Spearman, who hypothesised a single, measurable "general intelligence".
er e b i 1822: Francis Galton, founder of a new science called "eugenics", was born in Birmingham.
Although history largely credits Europeans for the invention of fingerprint identification systems (primarily William Herschel, Edward Henry, Francis Galton, and Henry Faulds), a Croatian man who emigrated to Argentina created, in the view of many experts, a far superior fingerprint system and used his system to convict a murderer in the first recorded use of fingerprints in a criminal case.
Biometric State begins in the early 1850s, when the inventor of fingerprinting, Francis Galton, toured Southern Africa, developing the racial biology that informed both racial segregation and, Breckenridge suggests, fingerprinting itself.