Franco-Prussian War

(redirected from Franco-German war)
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Franco-Prussian War

n
(Historical Terms) the war of 1870–71 between France and Prussia culminating in the fall of the French Second Empire and the founding of the German empire

Fran′co-Prus′sian War′

(ˈfræŋ koʊ ˈprʌʃ ən)
n.
the war between France and Prussia, 1870–71.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Franco-Prussian War - a war between France and Prussia that ended the Second Empire in France and led to the founding of modern GermanyFranco-Prussian War - a war between France and Prussia that ended the Second Empire in France and led to the founding of modern Germany; 1870-1871
References in classic literature ?
Compare the following stanzas, from a kind of palinode, "1870-1871," years of the Franco-German war and the Parisian Commune:--
At the heart of this Franco-German war is the clash between two Rs: the German commitment to rectitude versus the French penchant for redistribution.
Knierriem says that the tradition began in 1870 with the Franco-German War.
In 1945, at the end of Europe's third Franco-German war in 75 years, they knew that their countries could not survive another such failure.
We catch colorful glimpses from his youth: Prompted by his reading about the French defeat in the 1870-71 Franco-German War, he early decided on a military career.
The Algeciras Conference of 1906, which may have precluded a full-scale Franco-German war over rival claims to North Africa, only served to embitter Wilhelm II and support the plan by Admiral von Tirpitz, the father of the modern German navy, to construct a new fleet of battleships.
Doctrinally the Prussian army had been committed even before the Franco-German War to the principle that any irregular resistance must be ruthlessly suppressed because it enhanced war's suffering and increased its duration without altering the outcome.
And such was the public appetite for news at this time - with the Franco-German War in full sway - there was time and space to launch another daily paper in the shape of the Birmingham Daily Mail, which filled a lucrative gap later in the day, when the presses were otherwise idle.