Franco-Prussian War


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Franco-Prussian War

n
(Historical Terms) the war of 1870–71 between France and Prussia culminating in the fall of the French Second Empire and the founding of the German empire

Fran′co-Prus′sian War′

(ˈfræŋ koʊ ˈprʌʃ ən)
n.
the war between France and Prussia, 1870–71.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Franco-Prussian War - a war between France and Prussia that ended the Second Empire in France and led to the founding of modern GermanyFranco-Prussian War - a war between France and Prussia that ended the Second Empire in France and led to the founding of modern Germany; 1870-1871
References in classic literature ?
It was doing for the forty or fifty Bell Companies what Von Moltke did for the German army prior to the Franco-Prussian War.
There was a parallel instance in Aberdeen some years back, and something on very much the same lines at Munich the year after the Franco-Prussian War.
His firm went on to supply the grey cloth for the Confederate army in the American Civil War, and trapped Parisians ordered Crombie material by hot air balloon when the French capital was besieged during the Franco-Prussian War in 1871.
Anniversaries: 21st: Red Rum won Grand National for record third time and Charlotte Brew became the first woman to ride in the race; 160th: French politician Leon Gambetta escaped from Paris in a hot-air balloon in Franco-Prussian War.
Resistance to vaccination was widespread in the early 1800s but less so later in the century, particularly after the smallpox epidemic associated with the Franco-Prussian war, which took a terrible toll among the civilian population but not among the Prussian troops, who had been regularly revaccinated.
Fermer is a historian and former archivist who has previously published two volumes on the Franco-Prussian War, and he devotes this volume to the 1870 Battle of Sedan that was considered by many to be the turning point of that conflict.
The book tells how the race was launched amid a push for French men to improve their physical fitness to better perform in battle, following the humiliating 1870 defeat by Germany in the Franco-Prussian war.
British artists have always looked to Europe, taking time out in Paris, Vienna and Rome and the compliment was repaid when a few French painters arrived in London fleeing from the Franco-Prussian war of 1870/71.
analyzes coverage of the 1870 Franco-Prussian War in the illustrated weeklies not only of France and Germany, but also Britain and Canada.
He divides the period between the age of men from the French Revolution to German Unification, and the age of machines from the Franco-Prussian war through The Great War.
Among the topics are Roman Catholic Francophile Anglo-Irishman William Monsell; race, religion, and representation in Irish reactions to the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-71; mad Irish fiddlers in Paris; and Irish men and French food.
He argues that the Franco-Prussian War and its aftereffects made the combined France and Germany the heartland of Europe, despite the intrusions of the small and great wars between them and their allies up to 1940, and gives as evidence the parallels in compromised governance, volunteerist public ethics, problematic demography, struggling or stagnant economies, sexism, education for the elite, xenophobia, and a sense of defeat even before the cannons, whether of war or new cultural and social ideas, fired.