Francois Villon


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Related to Francois Villon: Francois Rabelais
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Noun1.Francois Villon - French poet (flourished around 1460)Francois Villon - French poet (flourished around 1460)
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An Ode to a Pioneer Poet of Trials and Testimony Francois Villon, a poet of the 15th century Was not of any classy royal gentry.
Swift refers to late medieval French writing, including that of Andre de La Vigne, Jean Molinet, Octavien de Saint-Gelais, Jean Lemaire, Alain Chartier, and Francois Villon, with meticulous translations.
These lines from Mazur's "Ou Sont Les Neiges D'Antan" ("Where are the Snows of Yesteryear") reference the French poet Francois Villon's memorializing ballad.
O corpus atribuido ao poeta frances medieval Francois Villon (1431-?) e constituido por dois poemas longos em forma de testamento e por aproximadamente vinte baladas esparsas, incluindo seis Ballades en jargon [Baladas em jargao].
He was impeccably polite and flirtatious when he met my mother, who could still recite his versions of Francois Villon's poems without hesitation.
Also signaling his allegiance to the ribald and the rude were his translations of the fifteenth-century convict poet Francois Villon, published in 1968 under the name Jean Calais with a preface and hoax footnotes a la Spicer.
Claire Pascolini-Campbell's "Problematic Genealogies: Algernon Charles Swinburne, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, and the Discovery of Francois Villon" (VP 52.4 [2014]: 661-678) corrects literary history by establishing that Swinburne was the first English translator and proponent of the fifteenth-century French poet Francois Villon, a laurel that is conventionally accorded to Rossetti.
As if pulled from Fattal's rib cage--which is pictured in the chest X-ray featured in the collage Plus bequetee d'oiseaux que des a coudre (Francois Villon) (More Needled by Birds Than a Darning Thimble [Francois Villon]), 2012--a cluster of nine small "goddess" sculptures in terra-cotta rose to life on a white platform at the center of the space.
The phrase is from French poet Francois Villon: "Where are the snows of yesteryear?"
It is named after a medieval French poet much lauded by Pound: Francois Villon, whose occasionally bawdy Testament, written during his imprisonment in a Paris jail, skewered local clergy and magistrates.