Francophobia


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Fran·co·phobe

 (frăng′kə-fōb′)
n.
A person who dislikes or fears France, its people, or its culture.

Fran′co·phobe′, Fran′co·pho′bic adj.
Fran′co·pho′bi·a n.

Francophobia

(ˌfræŋkəʊˈfəʊbɪə)
n
(sometimes not capital) the phenomenon of hating French speakers, culture, or people

Francophobia

a hatred of France or things French. Also called Gallophobia.
See also: France
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References in periodicals archive ?
Francophobia would hardly fit with Lyndsay's personal or political culture, especially given the power structures in the Scotland of his day.
In overturning the homebound assumptions of his Victorian contemporaries, Swinburne continued to enact what Charlotte Ribeyrol recently called, referring to other poems, his "transgressive francophilia" in the face of "Victorian francophobia.
8) Many Frenchmen remained loyal to Cartesian physics simply because Descartes was French, and British science at times showed signs of Francophobia.
I would add, parenthetically, that what happened in Newfoundland in the interwar years underscores how misplaced its francophobia had been.
victim of Francophobia by the faithful imitator of Irish bishops of the United States: it is racially based.
In many ways, reading Francophilia against Francophobia is a highly colourful means by which to address the representation of national character on the British stage in the aftermath of the French Revolution.
Hollandophobia or Francophobia could be and often was expressed in confessional terms; but Pincus quotes many contemporaries who framed the revolution and resulting Nine Years' War in terms of polities and trade: "not a war of religion" (Sir William Dutton Colt, quoted 342), but "to oppose .
Country-of-Origin, Animosity and Consumer Response: Marketing Implications of Anti-Americanism and Francophobia, International Business Review.
Here, the French knight is a murderer, but tempting though it might be to read some element of francophobia in this portrayal of a dishonest French knight, Radcliffe is again more concerned, I think, with issues of humanity and duty.
The examples of anti-Quebec coverage in English Canada during the 8 day parliamentary crisis were a reminder that the phenomenon of Francophobia in English Canada remains.
The biographer pokes fun at francophobia and americanophilia ("Levesque dreamed of Liz Taylor, not Brigitte Bardot") and at Levesque's fondness for comparing Quebec to, variously, Cuba, Zimbabwe, Palestine, the Thirteen Colonies.
Closely tied to this, the visual culture of cartoons, engravings, and paintings bolstered Francophobia for the benefit of national identity.