Frank Norris


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Related to Frank Norris: Theodore Dreiser, Stephen Crane
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Noun1.Frank Norris - United States writer (1870-1902)
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All existing Connell staff will be transferred to the Co-op Academies Trust, which runs a total of 12 academies in the Greater Manchester, this unique will be popular with students Hopcroft, Principal Leeds and Stokeon-Trent areas Frank Norris, Director of the Co-op Academies Trust said: "By providing a great education, Co-op Academies are changing the lives of thousands of young people and helping transform the communities in which they are situated.
Spokesman Frank Norris said: "We have vacancies across our various academies and because we are part of the Co-op we can offer benefits not usually associated with teaching."
Frank Norris and the Beginnings of Southern Fundamentalism (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1996); C.
"As Americans headed west, they wanted the Indians to go away, and they didn't care how or where," said Frank Norris, a historian with the Park Service's National Trails Intermountain Region.
The May 22, 1897 issue of the weekly magazine the Wave includes Frank Norris's sketch entitled The Puppets and the Puppy, which presents the philosophical dialogue that takes place in the corner of a playroom among five toy characters: a lead soldier, a doll, a mechanical rabbit, a queen's bishop from the chessboard, and the wooden manikin Japhet.
(20.) Stanley Wertheim, "Two Yellow Kids: Frank Norris and Stephen Crane," Frank Norris Studies, Spring, 1999, 2-8.
Frank Norris and the Murder Trial that Captivated America," foreword by Bob Schieffer of CBS News (July 2011 -- Steerforth Press/Random House), is a narrative non-fiction, true crime thriller set in the 1920s.
By the end, a conspiracy of misfortune, fraud and poverty seems completely overwhelming[mdash]a modern-day echo of what John Steinbeck and Frank Norris captured in their portrayal of ordinary folks crushed in America during the early 20th century." RON CHARLES
Crisler and McElrath Jr., co-authors of a biography of Norris and co-editors of other books, collect 67 reminiscences about American novelist Frank Norris (1870-1902) by his contemporaries, colleagues, friends, and family about his life, personality, writings, and the character and cultural context of the time, as well as his appearance, character, beliefs, literary taste, prejudices, and other aspects.
When Cather submitted The Song of the Lark to her publisher in 1915, she noted that it was written in the "full-blooded" style of neo-Darwinist authors like Frank Norris. (15) Norris had rebelled against the "tea-cup" realism of Henry James, turning instead to popular conceptions of Darwinism that emphasized sexual selection, particularly the role that female choice played in shaping male behavior.
Alternately, Donald Pizer reads the ending as an expression of Norris's evolutionary theism, which allowed him to "dramatize natural laws with greater emphasis on racial and social benefits than on individual destruction" (Frank Norris 114).
I read his books in our library at home when I was young and was fascinated by his story; but, more significantly, I became aware that he was a respected advocate of policy, much as Emory Upton and Alfred Mahan also were in the military field, and Henry George, Frank Norris, and Jack London were in their realms.