Frankenstein's monster

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Noun1.Frankenstein's monster - the monster created by Frankenstein in a gothic novel by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (the creator's name is commonly used to refer to his creation)Frankenstein's monster - the monster created by Frankenstein in a gothic novel by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (the creator's name is commonly used to refer to his creation)
References in periodicals archive ?
The Brexit Bill is creating a Frankenstein monster.
I begin by saying that Adolf Hitler became Europe's mad scientist whose Frankenstein monster was Nazism and the first victims were the Jews.
I am frightened of waking up from a facelift with one eye pointing north, the other south and a weird Frankenstein monster expression I cannot shift" - The dilemma facing broadcaster Vanessa Feltz.
Boy, the son of the Frankenstein monster and his bride, is a stitched-up computerized hacker who balances a desire for freedom with his responsibility to save the world from VI, a hostile computer virus that he creates.
HE was the Frankenstein monster who spawned Brummie rock supergroup Black Sabbath.
She may have left the stage but, like a Frankenstein monster, her legacy lives on.
U has trademarks or copyrights for many of the iconic movie monsters from its pictures of the 1930s, '40s and '50s, including Bela Lugosi's look as Count Dracula, Jack Pierce's makeup for the Frankenstein Monster and the Bride of Frankenstein, and the Creature From the Black Lagoon (a.
Here again, introductory (and in this case, conclusionary) claims to an argument that 'the black Frankenstein monster is insistently as much about aesthetic form as racial theme' (228) are made.
But then again when it comes to choosing between saving the lives of Irish people and a dead bank, Seanie Fitz's Frankenstein monster wins every time.
With Crane's work, Young identifies "an intrinsic connection between the fictional figure of the Frankenstein monster and the literary figure of the dead metaphor, outlining this connection generally and then in historical relation to late-nineteenth-century American accounts of metaphor" (68-69).
It's easy to expect that this time around, we'll see the same old, cobbled-together Frankenstein monster.
When we look at these what are called animal human hybrid embryos, it is not some Frankenstein monster we are creating, it is about taking an egg from a cow and injecting a bit of human DNA, keeping it for only 14 days, it is not going to be implanted into anybody.