Franklin tree

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Franklin tree

n.
A deciduous tree or shrub (Franklinia alatamaha) native to Georgia but now known only in cultivation, having large white fragrant flowers and colorful fall foliage.

[After Benjamin Franklin.]
References in periodicals archive ?
So taken were they by these trees that William eventually made a return trip to bring seeds and cuttings back home to Philadelphia, thus establishing in their botanical garden a planting of Franklinia. They named the genus after their friend, Benjamin Franklin.
The Gordonia has a rare and colorful history, the only cousin to the Franklinia alotamaha which has not been found in the wilds since it was discovered in 1764 by John & William Bartram.
The Franklinia alatamaha - known as the Franklin tree - has large fragrant, cup-shaped, snow-white blooms and is part of the tea family.
Whit Bronaugh: I really enjoyed your article on the Franklinia Tree.
They are extinct in their natural habitats but are alive in cultivation, such as species tulips (Tulipa sprengeri) and orchids and the Franklin tree (Franklinia alatamaha), and endangered species such as the Maidenhair tree (Ginkgo biloba).'
'They are extinct in their natural habitats but are alive in cultivation, such as species tulips (Tulipa sprengeri) and orchids and the Franklin tree (Franklinia alatamaha), and endangered species such as the Maidenhair tree (Ginkgo biloba).' Bulbs under threat include cyclamens, snowdrops and sternbergias listed by CITES, the convention governing the trade of endangered species.
Upon retirement in 1983, Porter fully devoted himself to tending his 6.5 acre homestead near Pickerington, OH, where he grew noteworthy trees such as the cucumber tree (Franklinia), saffireberry, and pawpaw.
Franklinia and Gingko, two beautiful trees that have disappeared from their wild habitats, now can be found only in cultivation.
It is very similar to Franklinia alatamaha, Ben Franklin Tree, but it is a larger size plant that is much less hardy.
He later described it as Franklinia alatamaha, a member of the tea family and close relative of the native loblolly-bay and stewartias, and the cultivated camellias.
These trees are beautiful specmiens of Yoshino cherries, Mount Vernon red maples, tulip poplars, willow oaks, crabapples, sweetgums, sycamores, green ash, and franklinia.