Franklin tree

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Franklin tree

n.
A deciduous tree or shrub (Franklinia alatamaha) native to Georgia but now known only in cultivation, having large white fragrant flowers and colorful fall foliage.

[After Benjamin Franklin.]
References in periodicals archive ?
05 million gift from the Franklinia Foundation will nearly double the size of the UBC Botanical Gardens Asian Garden, and provide additional educational and training opportunities to future horticulturalists and researchers.
We are grateful to the Franklinia Foundation for its generous support so that visitors may continue to experience and learn from the garden for years to come.
The Gordonia has a rare and colorful history, the only cousin to the Franklinia alotamaha which has not been found in the wilds since it was discovered in 1764 by John & William Bartram.
The Franklinia alatamaha - known as the Franklin tree - has large fragrant, cup-shaped, snow-white blooms and is part of the tea family.
Whit Bronaugh: I really enjoyed your article on the Franklinia Tree.
Each time I get into a thicket of flowering bays or paw-paw look-a-likes, I think about the Franklinia.
Franklinia and Gingko, two beautiful trees that have disappeared from their wild habitats, now can be found only in cultivation.
It is very similar to Franklinia alatamaha, Ben Franklin Tree, but it is a larger size plant that is much less hardy.
He later described it as Franklinia alatamaha, a member of the tea family and close relative of the native loblolly-bay and stewartias, and the cultivated camellias.
The Franklinia may not be familiar, but with its striking blossoms and fall foliage, it is no shrinking violet.
These trees are beautiful specmiens of Yoshino cherries, Mount Vernon red maples, tulip poplars, willow oaks, crabapples, sweetgums, sycamores, green ash, and franklinia.
The Franklinia became extinct in the wild over 200 years ago.