Franks


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frank 1

 (frăngk)
adj. frank·er, frank·est
1. Open and sincere in expression; straightforward: made several frank remarks about the quality of their work.
2. Clearly manifest; evident: frank enjoyment.
tr.v. franked, frank·ing, franks
1.
a. To put an official mark on (a piece of mail) so that it can be sent free of charge.
b. To send (mail) free of charge.
2. To place a stamp or mark on (a piece of mail) to show the payment of postage.
3. To enable (a person) to come and go freely.
n.
1.
a. A mark or signature placed on a piece of mail to indicate the right to send it free of charge.
b. The right to send mail free.
2. A franked piece of mail.

[Middle English, free, from Old French franc, from Late Latin Francus, Frank; see Frank.]

frank′ness n.
Synonyms: frank1, candid, forthright, outspoken, straightforward, open
These adjectives mean revealing or disposed to reveal one's thoughts freely and honestly. Frank implies directness, sometimes to the point of bluntness: "And yes, to be frank, the singing was atrocious" (Eileen Pollack).
Candid and forthright often suggest refusal to evade difficult or unpleasant issues: "Save, save, oh save me from the candid friend!" (George Canning)."He wanted his countrymen to know the truth, and he was forthright about the challenges they faced" (Sean Hannity).
Outspoken usually implies bold lack of reserve: "She is outspoken to the point of never holding back, on politics or much else" (Joseph Epstein).
Straightforward denotes directness of manner and expression: "George was a straightforward soul....'See here!' he said. 'Are you engaged to anybody?'" (Booth Tarkington).
Open suggests freedom from all trace of reserve or secretiveness: "I will be open and sincere with you" (Joseph Addison).

frank 2

 (frăngk)
n. Informal
A frankfurter.

Frank

 (frăngk)
n.
A member of one of the Germanic tribes of the Rhine region in the early Christian era, especially one of the Salian Franks who conquered Gaul about ad 500 and established an extensive empire that reached its greatest power in the ninth century.

[Middle English, from Old English Franca and Old French Franc, both from Late Latin Francus, of Germanic origin.]

Franks

A Germanic tribe of the Rhine region conquering Gaul from c. AD 500 and establishing an empire.
References in classic literature ?
If I had any capital to give them, I should make Frank a butcher, Cecil a baker, and Arthur a grocer -- those being the only human vocations I know of which are certain to be always in request.
At his intercession, and through his influence, Frank, Cecil, and Arthur were received on the foundation of a well-reputed grammar-school.
I paid the money over, received the bill of sale, and French Frank treated.
And I was appalled at the price French Frank had paid--eighty cents.
At first I considered these little letters, frank and earnest though they were, in the light of pretty compliments; but the letters continued to come during succeeding months, and even years.
Weston was giving some information about his son; she heard the words "my son," and "Frank," and "my son," repeated several times over; and, from a few other halfsyllables very much suspected that he was announcing an early visit from his son; but before she could quiet Mr.
I believe you did not hear me telling the others in the drawingroom that we are expecting Frank. I had a letter from him this morning, and he will be with us within a fortnight."
Why was I mad enough to let Frank know that I loved him?
In that confusion he will find his way to Frank! Don't ask me to wait.
Madeline had been removed; Frank had been absent; and Nicholas and Kate had begun to try in good earnest to stifle their own regrets, and to live for each other and for their mother--who, poor lady, could in nowise be reconciled to this dull and altered state of affairs--when there came one evening, per favour of Mr Linkinwater, an invitation from the brothers to dinner on the next day but one: comprehending, not only Mrs Nickleby, Kate, and Nicholas, but little Miss La Creevy, who was most particularly mentioned.
Kate was still more affected by the reception: for, knowing that the brothers were acquainted with all that had passed between her and Frank, she felt her position a most delicate and trying one, and was trembling on the arm of Nicholas, when Mr Charles took her in his, and led her to another part of the room.
They started directly, in a little carriage that Lightwood had brought with him from never-to-be-forgotten Greenwich; and from Greenwich they started directly for London; and in London they waited at a railway station until such time as the Reverend Frank Milvey, and Margaretta his wife, with whom Mortimer Lightwood had been already in conference, should come and join them.