Free Church

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Free Church

n
(Protestantism) chiefly
a. any Protestant Church, esp the Presbyterian, other than the Established Church
b. (as modifier): Free-Church attitudes.
References in periodicals archive ?
After 1900 most of the Free congregations re-joined the main body of the kirk (although there are still Free Churches in the area today) and their churches became surplus to requirements, frequently being demolished and sadly some are still gap sites to this day and now merely havens for wildlife, not souls!
First, it addresses the topic of the typology of Free churches and the Pentecostal mission movement.
"They will be expected to take a lead on faith issues relating to the needs of those from free churches backgrounds and will be involved in leading and participating in Christian ecumenical Sunday services.
In 1900, due to theological disputes within the Free Kirk, 25 of the Free Churches in the city joined with United Presbyterians to become United Free.
Readers who associate Southern Baptists with evangelicals will be surprised that Yarnell sharply distinguishes the latter from believers churches (or "free churches"; he uses these names interchangeably).
Dr Sentamu baptised men and women from a number of different Christian traditions, including the Anglican, Elim and Free Churches.
This collection of essays also presents Yoder's reflections on the Free Churches or Peace Churches spiritual solidarity with prophetic Judaism.
Open Bethlehem gave the passports to the Archbishop of Canterbury Dr Rowan Williams (right), the Archbishop of Westminster Cardinal Cormac Murphy O'Connor, Bishop Nathan Hovannisian of the Armenian Church of Great Britain and Reverend David Coffey of the Free Churches.
Staff, residents and trustees of the home, which was set up by members of the city's free churches, are celebrating their 50th anniversary this year.
Many current ecclesiological ideas (ecclesia, Latin for assembly or Church) rather refer to the model of certain North American 'free churches,' in which, in the past, believers took refuge from the oppressive model of the 'State Church' produced by the Reformation.
Free churches and other evangelical Christians are descendents of the Radical Reformation.
However, already by the end of the 1930s, the Estonian Pentecostals had merged mostly with the Evangelical Christians Free Churches, and the Revivalist Free Churches had joined mainly with the Baptists.