Free French

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Noun1.Free French - a French movement during World War II that was organized in London by Charles de Gaulle to fight for the liberation of France from German control and for the restoration of the republicFree French - a French movement during World War II that was organized in London by Charles de Gaulle to fight for the liberation of France from German control and for the restoration of the republic
Second World War, World War 2, World War II - a war between the Allies (Australia, Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Czechoslovakia, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Ethiopia, France, Greece, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iran, Iraq, Luxembourg, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Panama, Philippines, Poland, South Africa, United Kingdom, United States, USSR, Yugoslavia) and the Axis (Albania, Bulgaria, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Rumania, Slovakia, Thailand) from 1939 to 1945
social movement, movement, front - a group of people with a common ideology who try together to achieve certain general goals; "he was a charter member of the movement"; "politicians have to respect a mass movement"; "he led the national liberation front"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The back of the Royal Automobile Club faces Carlton Gardens, a quiet dead-end street where, at No 4, a tall, plain building served as the headquarters of the Free French Forces. A small blue plaque honors de Gaulle, while a second, larger panel displays a version of his famous appeal, embellished with French flags, the Lorraine Cross (the symbol of the Free French) and, running across the bottom, the words "Vive La France!"
Large numbers were used by Free French forces through the end of the war, and additional numbers were provided to the FFI in occupied France who considered it "...
Aumont married her, in July 1943, days before he left to fight for the Free French Forces. The couple reunited after the war in Europe, had a daughter, and moved to France in 1946.
Of new skeins, the Brutal Media-produced miniseries "We Shall Return" turns on Catalans who fled Spain after its Civil War, ending up fighting for the Free French Forces.
When General de Gaulle repudiated the authority of the provisional government at the time of the Franco-German armistice in June 1940 and began gathering the first of the Free French Forces around him in London, much of the potency of his campaign was derived from his sense of a wound to French honour, of a loss that had to be appeased.
One military leader who spotted the folly of the Maginot Line early on was Charles de Gaulle, who escaped and set up his Free French Forces HQ in Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire.
Despite the word 'British' in their rifle, they were actually intending to support the Free French forces in the North African campaign.
After the successful Allied landings in North Africa (Operation TORCH), Catroux was appointed commander in chief of Free French forces in the Middle East.
His father had fought with the Free French forces during the war and then worked in the French administration.
The men, aged between 85 and 92, are among the last surviving members of the Free French Forces who fought in the Second World War.