word order

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word order

n.
The linear arrangement of words in a sentence, clause, or phrase.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

word order

n
(Linguistics) the arrangement of words in a phrase, clause, or sentence. In many languages, including English, word order plays an important part in determining meanings expressed in other languages by inflections
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

word′ or`der


n.
the way in which words are arranged in sequence in a sentence or smaller construction.
[1890–95]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.word order - the order of words in a textword order - the order of words in a text  
text, textual matter - the words of something written; "there were more than a thousand words of text"; "they handed out the printed text of the mayor's speech"; "he wants to reconstruct the original text"
ordering, ordination, order - logical or comprehensible arrangement of separate elements; "we shall consider these questions in the inverse order of their presentation"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
ordre des mots

word order

nordine m delle parole
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
It is rather amazing." This also brings other interesting properties, such as free word order where the subject, object or the verb can be arranged in any possible order.
Neidorf shows that diachronic change affected the manuscript at multiple levels: morphological change introduced errors such as instrumental forms rendered as datives, the use of inflected infinitives, and contracted forms in the place of precontracted ones; lexical change allowed archaic and poetic terms, especially compounds, to be lost through trivialization (an unfamiliar word replaced with a familiar one); and syntactic change caused errors in case endings and function words, since the scribes were unused to the relatively free word order and limited number of prepositions of early Old English.