melting point

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melt·ing point

(mĕl′tĭng)
n. Abbr. mp
1. The temperature at which a solid becomes a liquid at a fixed pressure, usually standard pressure.
2. The temperature at which a solid and its liquid are in equilibrium, at any fixed pressure.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

melting point

n
(Chemistry) the temperature at which a solid turns into a liquid. It is equal to the freezing point
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

melt′ing point`


n.
the temperature at which a solid substance melts or fuses.
[1835–45]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

melt·ing point

(mĕl′tĭng)
The temperature at which a solid becomes a liquid. For a given substance, the melting point of its solid form is the same as the freezing point of its liquid form. The melting point of ice is 32°F (0°C); that of iron is 2,797°F (1,535°C).
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.melting point - the temperature below which a liquid turns into a solidmelting point - the temperature below which a liquid turns into a solid
temperature - the degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment (corresponding to its molecular activity)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

melting point

npunto di fusione
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
They are suited for use with solvent traps, freeze point apparatus, impact testing and other applications requiring low temperatures.
It reportedly gives longer gel time than competing materials, and also has a lower freeze point than previous carbodiimide-modified MDIs, such as monomeric 4,4 MDI.