melting point

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melt·ing point

(mĕl′tĭng)
n. Abbr. mp
1. The temperature at which a solid becomes a liquid at a fixed pressure, usually standard pressure.
2. The temperature at which a solid and its liquid are in equilibrium, at any fixed pressure.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

melting point

n
(Chemistry) the temperature at which a solid turns into a liquid. It is equal to the freezing point
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

melt′ing point`


n.
the temperature at which a solid substance melts or fuses.
[1835–45]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

melt·ing point

(mĕl′tĭng)
The temperature at which a solid becomes a liquid. For a given substance, the melting point of its solid form is the same as the freezing point of its liquid form. The melting point of ice is 32°F (0°C); that of iron is 2,797°F (1,535°C).
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.melting point - the temperature below which a liquid turns into a solidmelting point - the temperature below which a liquid turns into a solid
temperature - the degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment (corresponding to its molecular activity)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

melting point

npunto di fusione
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995