French Canadian

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French Canadian

n.
A Canadian of French ancestry.

French′-Ca·na′di·an adj.

French Canadian

n
(Peoples) a Canadian citizen whose native language is French
adj
1. (Peoples) of or relating to French Canadians or their language
2. (Languages) of or relating to French Canadians or their language

French′ Cana′dian


n.
1. a Canadian whose first language is French, esp. a descendant of the colonists of New France.
adj.
3. Also, French′-Cana′dian. of or pertaining to French Canadians or the French-speaking parts of Canada.
[1750–60]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.French Canadian - a Canadian descended from early French settlers and whose native language is French
Acadian - an early French settler in the Maritimes
Canadian - a native or inhabitant of Canada
Canuck - informal term for Canadians in general and French Canadians in particular
Translations

French Canadian

adj & nfranco-canadese (m/f)
References in classic literature ?
In fact, I used to hear a great deal more at Bangor, from those French Canadians that came down to cut the ice, than I saw I should ever hear at that hotel.
A gang of French Canadians fell almost on top of him.
Moreover, like many of her male contemporaries (both French Canadian and American), Marguerite could imagine none but disastrous consequences from any efforts to "emancipate" women from their dependent status, fearing that these moves would upset the gender ideologies on which she and others based their understanding of how society worked, and more specifically, their understanding of what made French Canadians unique on the American landscape.
What do you think of the French Canadians trying to separate themselves from Canada?
There was a sort of gloom that pervaded everything and reached into the enclaves of the Irish in the Acre section of town, the hard-working Greeks who settled near downtown, the Billerica Poles and the French Canadians who inhabited Moody Street and Pawtucketville.
The cultures of the stereotypical, rough-cut native French Canadians and the prejudiced townspeople of Big Harbour clash constantiy, displaying routine abrasiveness and underlying distrust on both sides.
One of the most common types of marital relationship among the older French Canadians in our study we labeled "traditional.
The French Canadians, who, by 1897, accounted for 800 of Toronto's population, were employed chiefly in factories.
He demanded a more generous interpretation of the Constitution, one that would respect and guarantee the rights of French Canadians everywhere in Canada, not just in Quebec.
This perception has been explained by the strong presence of French Canadians who were poor and had a lower preference for home ownership.
But, many French Canadians have seen this attempt to sweeten a bitter pill as a dilution of the importance of their language.