Napoleonic Code

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Napoleonic Code

n
(Law) the English name for Code Napoléon
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Code Na•po•lé•on

(kɔd na pɔ leɪˈɔ̃; Eng. ˈkoʊd nəˌpoʊ leɪˈɔ̃)
n.
the civil code of France, enacted in 1804. Also called Napoleonic Code.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The NIOC vide email dated January 9, 2019, proposed to sign an addendum to the IP-GSPA in order to extend the limitation period of any claim under the IP-GSPA as Article 224 of the French Civil Code provides that claim for breach of a contractual obligation may be brought within five years from the day the obligations became due.
Indeed, article 212 of the French Civil Code states: "Married partners owe each other the duty of respect, delity, help and assistance."
In this respect, art L 526-17 -I- of the French Civil Code expressly provides the transfer, based on documents inter vivos, of the patrimony by appropriation, which can occur both under a document of onerous title and under a free of charge document, respectively: sale, donation, contribution to a company's patrimony either to natural persons or legal persons (42).
(16) By referring to the above-referenced Article 1147 of the French Civil Code in all its decisions, the French Supreme Court referred to the general principles of contractual civil liability, confirming that courts cannot rely on the concept of the obligation to achieve a safe result.
DOHA FOR the first time ever, the French civil code, whose laws form the basis of the legal system of the majority of Arab countries, including Qatar, is available in the mother tongue of these countries, the Arabic language, and in a fine reference edition published by Dalloz, renowned French publishers of legal works.
In the French civil code, marriage is defined explicitly as a relationship oriented toward the creation of a family.
This, of course, flagrantly contradicted the universality of the French civil code, which did not in theory tolerate such distinctions among its citizens.
The French Civil Code stipulates mortgage and pledge separately from contracts and property.
Drawing attention to a section of the French Civil Code which states "everyone has the right to privacy", she said courts have generally been strict in enforcing that right.
Although portions of the French Civil Code were imported directly (notably with regard to private property), certain aspects of classical Islamic jurisprudence were codified with modifications intended to reform elements subject to abuse.
In the same year, it also amended Article 2011 of the French Civil Code which relates to the setting up of trusts.
(6) Speranskii completed this work by borrowing the newest systematization of possessive rights from the French Civil Code (which, of course, was said to reflect the principles of Roman law).