French Equatorial Africa

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Related to French Equatorial: Federation of French Equatorial Africa

French Equatorial Africa

Formerly French Congo.
A former federation (1910-1958) of French territories in west-central Africa comprising the present-day countries of Chad, Gabon, Congo, and Central African Republic.

French Equatorial Africa

n
(Placename) the former French overseas territories of Chad, Gabon, Middle Congo, and Ubangi-Shari (1910–58)

French′ Equato′rial Af′rica


n.
a former federation of French territories in central Africa, including Chad, Gabon, Middle Congo (now People's Republic of the Congo), and Ubangi-Shari (now Central African Republic): each became independent in 1960.
References in periodicals archive ?
Undaunted, he built a small hospital in Lambarene, then French Equatorial Africa, from what had been a chicken coop, and worked there until his death in 1965.
French Equatorial Africa was a large, landlocked area with a relatively small population, which had been the semi-fiefdom of private companies under French colonial rule and became a semi-fiefdom under barely competent military men after independence.
When World War II broke out, as part of the WAFF, units of the Gold Coast Regiment took part in the 1940 Allied invasions of Vichy-controlled French West Africa and French Equatorial Africa.
Chapters III, IV, and V examine the development of European medical practices in German East Africa, French Equatorial Africa, and British Uganda.
Gabon is in western Central Africa, and in Schweitzer's lifetime was part of French Equatorial Africa.
France, the other big winner, got much of West and Central Africa--all the way from Mauritania, Senegal, Mali, Guinea, Burkina Faso, Cote d'Ivoire, Niger, Chad, Benin (all these territories were then called French West Africa), to Gabon, Central African Republic, Congo-Brazzaville (forming French Equatorial Africa), to French Somaliland (modern Djibouti) in the northeast, and Madagascar in the southeast.
Author and doctor Schweitzer established a hospital in Lambarene (now in Gabon) in 1913, what was then French Equatorial Africa.
Africans answered the call in large numbers; it has been estimated that some 120,000 men were mobilized from French West Africa and French Equatorial Africa.
After joining the Department in 1947, he served overseas in Germany, Denmark, Iraq, Belgium, French Equatorial Africa (where he helped introduce baseball to children), Somalia and Burundi.
Born in Neuilly, France, to Brethren United States missionaries, he spent his youth in France and French Equatorial Africa.
Examples of the buildings were constructed for the French Equatorial Africa Pavilion at the Exposition Coloniale Internationale, Paris 1931, which is recounted at length.