New France

(redirected from French North America)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

New France

The possessions of France in North America from the 1500s until the Treaty of Paris (1763), which awarded French holdings to Great Britain and Spain. At its greatest extent it included much of southeast Canada, the Great Lakes region, and the Mississippi Valley. British and French rivalry for control of the territory led to the four conflicts known as the French and Indian Wars (1689-1763).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

New France

n
(Placename) the former French colonies and possessions in North America, most of which were lost to England and Spain by 1763: often restricted to the French possessions in Canada
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

New′ France′


n.
the French possessions in North America up to 1763.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Focusing on settings ranging from Europe to French North America to Spanish America to the Caribbean to Australia and New Zealand, the various essays bring to life an early modern world teeming with distinct, competing, and changeable legal jurisdictions.
Chapter 3 forms an instructive companion piece to the main consideration of French missionary writers in Indochina and Yunnan in Chapters 7 and 8, through a discussion of the much earlier ethnographical works by Catholic missionaries in French North America, such as Brebeuf's seventeenth-century work on the Huron (p.
[R]ural Quebeckers kept having babies with little sign of contraceptive practices right up into the twentieth century." (35) Beyond the rhetoric of the "revenge of the cradles" lies a more popular form of solidarity which assumes different ethnic and racial expression -- la familiari in Italian immigrant communities, the clan or the band among Native Americans, and la parente in French North America. "To a remarkable degree," writes Franca Iacovetta, "southern Italian families preserved tr aditional cultural forms and familial arrangements and thereby resisted disintegration." (36) The same "remarkable" attribute of persistent family-oriented strategies is not difficult to find among French North Americans in New England's industrial heartland.