classicism

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Related to French classicists: classicists

clas·si·cism

 (klăs′ĭ-sĭz′əm) also clas·si·cal·ism (-kə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. Aesthetic attitudes and principles manifested in the art, architecture, and literature of ancient Greece and Rome and characterized by emphasis on form, simplicity, proportion, and restraint.
2. Adherence to the aesthetic values embodied in ancient Greek and Roman art, architecture, and literature.
3. Classical scholarship.
4. A Greek or Latin expression or idiom.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

classicism

(ˈklæsɪˌsɪzəm) or

classicalism

n
1. (Art Terms) a style based on the study of Greek and Roman models, characterized by emotional restraint and regularity of form, associated esp with the 18th century in Europe; the antithesis of romanticism. Compare neoclassicism
2. knowledge or study of the culture of ancient Greece and Rome
3.
a. a Greek or Latin form or expression
b. an expression in a modern language, such as English, that is modelled on a Greek or Latin form
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

clas•si•cism

(ˈklæs əˌsɪz əm)

also clas•si•cal•ism

(-ɪ kəˌlɪz əm)

n.
1. the principles or styles characteristic of the literature and art of ancient Greece and Rome.
2. adherence to such principles.
3. the classical style in literature and art, or adherence to its principles.
4. a Greek or Latin idiom or form, esp. one used in some other language.
5. classical scholarship or learning.
[1820–30]
clas`si•cis′tic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

classicism

1. formerly, an imitation of Greek and Roman art.
2. currently, a dedication to the principles of that art: clarity of execution, balance, adherence to recognized standards of form, and conscious craftsmanship. — classicist, n.classicistic, adj.
See also: Art
1. the employment of compositional formulas and decorative techniques based upon the architecture of ancient Greece or Rome, but often including new ideas.
2. the employment of formulas and decorative techniques with an emphasis upon the subordination of utility in order to stress perfection of form.
See also: Architecture
a literary style characterized by formal adherence to traditions of structure, content, and genre. — classicist, n. — classicize, v.
See also: Literary Style
the principles or style of classic art or literature. — classicist, n.
See also: Antiquity
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.classicism - a movement in literature and art during the 17th and 18th centuries in Europe that favored rationality and restraint and strict forms; "classicism often derived its models from the ancient Greeks and Romans"
artistic style, idiom - the style of a particular artist or school or movement; "an imaginative orchestral idiom"
arts, humanistic discipline, humanities, liberal arts - studies intended to provide general knowledge and intellectual skills (rather than occupational or professional skills); "the college of arts and sciences"
Romantic Movement, Romanticism - a movement in literature and art during the late 18th and early 19th centuries that celebrated nature rather than civilization; "Romanticism valued imagination and emotion over rationality"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

classicism

[ˈklæsɪsɪzəm] Nclasicismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

classicism

[ˈklæsɪsɪzəm] n (ART)classicisme m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

classicism

nKlassik f; (= style of classic architecture)Klassizismus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

classicism

[ˈklæˌsɪsɪzm] nclassicismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, he is conversant with recent French social theory (Foucault, Bourdieu, French classicists such as Detienne, Gernet, and Vidal-Naquet) and important contributors to the history of science (Crombie, Daston, Galison, Hacking, Latour, and Shapin).
There are, for example, old-school French classicists such as Bertrand Tavernier, in competition with his 16th-century costume drama "The Princess of Montpensier." But there's also Thai iconoclast Apichatpong Weerasethakul, whose "Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives" is a 16mm feature inspired by the writings of a Buddhist monk.
In drama the term refers more specifically to any of three principles derived by French classicists from Aristotle's Poetics and requiring a play to have a single action represented as occurring in one place and within one day.