French curve


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French curve

French curve

n.
A flat drafting instrument with curved edges and several scroll-shaped cutouts, used as a guide in drawing curves when constructing graphs or making engineering drawings.

French curve

n
(Tools) a thin plastic sheet with profiles of several curves, used by draughtsmen for drawing curves

French′

(or french′) curve′,


n.
a flat drafting instrument, the edges of which are cut into several scroll-like curves enabling lines of varying curvature to be drawn.
[1880–85]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Anjali Sharma, Chief Designer and Owner at French Curve and Deepa Reddy, Founder at The Open Trunk give some ideas on how to opt for right colour, cut and fabric while deciding the bridal wear.
Using a French curve, connect the two markings to create a smooth curve for a new, higher neckline.
Flat Spine is a reworking of a 2014 sculpture titled French Curve, which was part of Baghramian's show at the Art Institute of Chicago that year.
Interpolation between the plotted points is achieved either by straight-line connections or else by means of curved joins made with the use of a French curve, supplied as part of the pattern-making kit.
MEYERS & SONS: a stainless steel T-Square; an 18-inch stainless steel graphic-arts ruler and a classic French curve. The blades of the new Lance T-Squares are made from the finest grade of stainless steel with the right amount of flexibility to always snap back to shape.
A thin thread unwinds from the abdomen out to one "foot," then circles around through the other five feet before going on to the cutoff, tracing a rough French curve through the air.
His aptly named "French Curve" is not only easy on the eye, but, also, the deep set and gentle angle of the gun allow it to sit low in the pocket (think: Dockers) while still allowing a full firing grip when you go for the metal.
Novel touches for Kenmore include French Curve Eurostyling, and graphite and biscuit as color options.
(Though perhaps I should have slid my French Curve a bit more to the left when I drew the overlay.)
In this work, for example, a protractor-like shape can be seen as well as some modifications of familiar French curve templates.
If the drawing calls for curves, arcs, circles, and ellipses, the draftsperson generally uses a French curve or compass to draw them.