French paradox


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Related to French paradox: resveratrol

French paradox

n
(Medicine) the theory that the lower incidence of heart disease in Mediterranean countries compared to that in the US is a consequence of the larger intake of flavonoids from red wine in these countries
References in periodicals archive ?
The third way to solve the French paradox lies in a different direction: the observation that the French economy is not doing that well after all.
The presentation touched on such topics as the fermentation process and the infamous French paradox.
Cambridge biotech firm Lycotec believes these could be the "missing piece in the French paradox puzzle".
17, 1991, when CBS televised "The French Paradox," which projected a strong likelihood that red wine prevented heart disease.
Though, there could be other possibilities: Red wine contains hundreds of biologically active compounds in addition to resveratrol, and any one of them--or all of them acting together--could possibly account for the French paradox.
The French Paradox is that they eat what they want in small portions and so stay thin.
Two recent studies (7,8) have shed some light on the French Paradox or "Is alcohol beneficial or harmful with regards CAD?
is consistent with the theory that the resveratrol in red wine explains the French paradox, the observation that French people eat a relatively high-fat diet but have a low death rate from heart disease.
However, if resveratrol is part of the answer to the French paradox, even that small amount may be beneficial.
Amongst the company's offerings are high value natural antioxidants, such as PROVINOLS, which is a red wine extract that is rich in red wine polyphenols and brings the health benefits of the French Paradox to nutritional applications.
Amongst creatures great and small, ducks are an unparalleled source of monounsaturated fat, one of the super foods like red wine, whole grains, and raw fruits and vegetables credited with the French paradox effect.
Gone will be the days of the French Paradox and the touted health benefits of moderate red wine consumption.