French and Indian War

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French and Indian War

n.
A war (1756-1763) fought by Britain against the French and their Native American allies, part of the conflict known in Europe as the Seven Years' War. Britain, emerging victorious, took possession of the French territories in Canada and became the dominant colonial power in North America.

French and Indian War

n
(Historical Terms) the war (1755–60) between the French and British, each aided by different Indian tribes, that formed part of the North American Seven Years' War
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Noun1.French and Indian War - a war in North America between France and Britain (both aided by American Indian tribes); 1755-1760
Seven Years' War - a war of England and Prussia against France and Austria (1756-1763); Britain and Prussia got the better of it
References in periodicals archive ?
Ian MacPherson McCulloch's HIGHLANDER IN THE FRENCH-INDIAN WAR 1756-67 (9781846032745, $18.
Published originally by the State Historical Society of Wisconsin in 1925 this reprint with a comprehensive index excites many genealogists and historians interested in the Huguenots, the French-Indian War, the fur trade, exploration of the old Northwest, and the French residents of Wisconsin.
In the fall of 1755, on the very eve of the Seven Years War, known in North America as the French-Indian War (1756-1763), the expulsion, or what the Acadians and French call le grand derangement, was executed.