Frenchman


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French·man

 (frĕnch′mən)
n.
1. A man who is a native or inhabitant of France.
2. A man of French ancestry.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Frenchman

(ˈfrɛntʃmən)
n, pl -men
(Peoples) a native, citizen, or inhabitant of France
ˈFrenchˌwoman fem n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

French•man

(ˈfrɛntʃ mən)

n., pl. -men.
1. a native or inhabitant of France.
2. a French ship.
[before 1150]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Frenchman - a person of French nationality
France, French Republic - a republic in western Europe; the largest country wholly in Europe
European - a native or inhabitant of Europe
Gaul, frog - a person of French descent
Parisian - a native or resident of Paris
Breton - a native or inhabitant of Brittany (especially one who speaks the Breton language)
Savoyard - a resident of Savoy
Angevin, Angevine - a resident of Anjou
Norman - an inhabitant of Normandy
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Francouz
franskmand
ranskalainen
Francuz
フランス人男性
프랑스 사람
Francoz
fransman
ชายฝรั่งเศส
đàn ông Pháp

Frenchman

[ˈfrentʃmən] N (Frenchmen (pl)) → francés m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Frenchman

[ˈfrɛntʃmən] nFrançais mFrench mustard nmoutarde f douceFrench polish nvernis m, vernis m à l'alcoolFrench Riviera n
the French Riviera → la Côte d'AzurFrench-speaking [ˈfrɛntʃspiːkɪŋ] adjfrancophoneFrench stick nbaguette fFrench toast n
(US) (bread dipped in egg and then fried)pain m perdu
(British) (= very thin toast) → pain m grillé (d'un seul côté)French window nporte-fenêtre f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Frenchman

[ˈfrɛntʃmən] n (-men (pl)) → francese m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

Frenchman

فَرَنسِيّ Francouz franskmand Franzose Γάλλος francés ranskalainen Français Francuz francese フランス人男性 프랑스 사람 Fransman franskmann Francuz francês француз fransman ชายฝรั่งเศส Fransız erkek đàn ông Pháp 法国人
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
The Frenchman was asleep as well as Stepan Arkadyevitch.
The Frenchman was asleep, or pretending to be asleep, with his head on the back of his chair, and his moist hand, as it lay on his knee, made faint movements, as though trying to catch something.
Blanche, Maria Philipovna, and Polina Alexandrovna in one of them, and the Frenchman, the Englishman, and the General in attendance on horseback!
During the meal the Frenchman was in great feather: he was discursive and pompous to every one.
You come from that country, you are a Frenchman, and the orders which I see glittering upon your person announce you to be a man of merit as well as a man of quality."
A Frenchman imagined the idea of suppressing this obstacle."
"How quiet, peaceful, and solemn; not at all as I ran," thought Prince Andrew- "not as we ran, shouting and fighting, not at all as the gunner and the Frenchman with frightened and angry faces struggled for the mop: how differently do those clouds glide across that lofty infinite sky!
Coming still nearer with the expiring breeze, we saw that the Frenchman had a second whale alongside; and this second whale seemed even more of a nosegay than the first.
Upon which Ahab retired, and Stubb returned to the Frenchman. He now perceived that the Guernsey-man, who had just got into the chains, and was using a cutting-spade, had slung his nose in a sort of bag.
Even at that final moment the Frenchman asserted himself.
He has made no scruple of preferring the testimony of Father du Bernat to the writings of all the Portuguese Jesuits, to whom he allows great zeal, but little learning, without giving any other reason than that his favourite was a Frenchman. This is writing only to Frenchmen and to Papists: a Protestant would be desirous to know why he must imagine that Father du Bernat had a cooler head or more knowledge; and why one man whose account is singular is not more likely to be mistaken than many agreeing in the same account.
Without a word Tarzan of the Apes cut the bonds which held the Frenchman. Weak from suffering and loss of blood, he would have fallen but for the strong arm that caught him.