Freud


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Freud

 (froid), Anna 1895-1982.
Austrian-born British psychoanalyst noted for her application of psychoanalysis to child therapy.

Freud

, Sigmund 1856-1939.
Austrian physician and founder of psychoanalysis who theorized that the symptoms of hysterical patients represent forgotten and unresolved infantile psychosexual conflicts. His psychoanalytic theories, which initially met with hostility, profoundly influenced 20th-century thought.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Freud

(frɔɪd)
n
1. (Biography) Anna. 1895–1982, Austrian psychiatrist: daughter of Sigmund Freud and pioneer of child psychoanalysis
2. (Biography) Sir Clement. 1924–2009, British broadcaster, writer, politician, and chef; best known as a panellist on the radio game show Just a Minute; grandson of Sigmund Freud
3. (Biography) Lucian. 1922–2011, British painter, esp of nudes and portraits; grandson of Sigmund Freud
4. (Biography) Sigmund (ˈziːkmʊnt). 1856–1939, Austrian psychiatrist; originator of psychoanalysis, based on free association of ideas and analysis of dreams. He stressed the importance of infantile sexuality in later development, evolving the concept of the Oedipus complex. His works include The Interpretation of Dreams (1900) and The Ego and the Id (1923)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Freud

(frɔɪd)

n.
1. Anna, 1895–1982, British psychoanalyst, born in Austria (daughter of Sigmund Freud).
2. Lucian, born 1932, British painter, born in Germany.
3. Sigmund, 1856–1939, Austrian neurologist: founder of psychoanalysis.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Freud - Austrian neurologist who originated psychoanalysis (1856-1939)Freud - Austrian neurologist who originated psychoanalysis (1856-1939)
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References in classic literature ?
The connection of dreams, irrational beliefs and foolish actions with unconscious wishes has been brought to light, though with some exaggeration, by Freud and Jung and their followers.
Returning from this digression to our main topic, namely, the criticism of "consciousness," we observe that Freud and his followers, though they have demonstrated beyond dispute the immense importance of "unconscious" desires in determining our actions and beliefs, have not attempted the task of telling us what an "unconscious" desire actually is, and have thus invested their doctrine with an air of mystery and mythology which forms a large part of its popular attractiveness.
It is not necessary to suppose, as Freud seems to do, that every unconscious wish was once conscious, and was then, in his terminology, "repressed" because we disapproved of it.
Such 'wishes' need never have been 'conscious,' and NEED NEVER HAVE BEEN SUPPRESSED INTO FREUD'S REALM OF THE UNCONSCIOUS.
With a solid collection of paintings currently attracting lots of attention on view at the swank Upper East Side townhouse Acquavella Galleries, and an exhibition of mainly self-portraits coming this October to the Royal Academy in London, (which, if it were up to me, would be titled: "Me, Myself, and Everything They Say About Me"), it is time for me to say everything I think about the despicable genius, Lucian Freud.
Freud: The Making of an Illusion, by Frederick Crews.
Freud: The Making of an Illusion By Frederick Crews (Holt/Metropolitan Books, 2017)
The Sigmund Freud Collection at the Library of Congress has been digitized and now is online with more than 20,000 items, containing the personal papers of Freud (1856-1939), the neurologist and founder of psychoanalysis, whose ideas of the unconscious and theories on sex, repression, transference, and religion profoundly influenced 20th-century Western thought.
In anticipation of these others, I offer Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) and Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936), both of whom will be discussed later in the paper as examples of two investigators who seized the moment.