Freud

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Freud

 (froid), Anna 1895-1982.
Austrian-born British psychoanalyst noted for her application of psychoanalysis to child therapy.

Freud

, Sigmund 1856-1939.
Austrian physician and founder of psychoanalysis who theorized that the symptoms of hysterical patients represent forgotten and unresolved infantile psychosexual conflicts. His psychoanalytic theories, which initially met with hostility, profoundly influenced 20th-century thought.

Freud

(frɔɪd)
n
1. (Biography) Anna. 1895–1982, Austrian psychiatrist: daughter of Sigmund Freud and pioneer of child psychoanalysis
2. (Biography) Sir Clement. 1924–2009, British broadcaster, writer, politician, and chef; best known as a panellist on the radio game show Just a Minute; grandson of Sigmund Freud
3. (Biography) Lucian. 1922–2011, British painter, esp of nudes and portraits; grandson of Sigmund Freud
4. (Biography) Sigmund (ˈziːkmʊnt). 1856–1939, Austrian psychiatrist; originator of psychoanalysis, based on free association of ideas and analysis of dreams. He stressed the importance of infantile sexuality in later development, evolving the concept of the Oedipus complex. His works include The Interpretation of Dreams (1900) and The Ego and the Id (1923)

Freud

(frɔɪd)

n.
1. Anna, 1895–1982, British psychoanalyst, born in Austria (daughter of Sigmund Freud).
2. Lucian, born 1932, British painter, born in Germany.
3. Sigmund, 1856–1939, Austrian neurologist: founder of psychoanalysis.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Freud - Austrian neurologist who originated psychoanalysis (1856-1939)Freud - Austrian neurologist who originated psychoanalysis (1856-1939)
References in classic literature ?
The connection of dreams, irrational beliefs and foolish actions with unconscious wishes has been brought to light, though with some exaggeration, by Freud and Jung and their followers.
Returning from this digression to our main topic, namely, the criticism of "consciousness," we observe that Freud and his followers, though they have demonstrated beyond dispute the immense importance of "unconscious" desires in determining our actions and beliefs, have not attempted the task of telling us what an "unconscious" desire actually is, and have thus invested their doctrine with an air of mystery and mythology which forms a large part of its popular attractiveness.
It is not necessary to suppose, as Freud seems to do, that every unconscious wish was once conscious, and was then, in his terminology, "repressed" because we disapproved of it.
The annotations and footnotes are detailed yet subtle; through them, the reader is tactfully and usefully introduced to the links between the lives of the Freuds and the historical evets of the first half of last century: from the difficulties of wartime travel between 1914 and 1918 to the ominous rise of National Socialism that uprooted and displaced the family.
FEW families have made their mark on the wider world like the Freuds.
Its essays are at their best when they reveal the extent to which new times called for new Freuds.
When the Freuds moved to Vienna, they moved to the capital of a consciously polyglot empire, where German and Hungarian were only the most prominent languages, alongside Czech, Polish, Ukrainian, Romanian, Croat, Serb, Slovene, Italian, Yiddish and Romani.
Both Sigmund Freuds were theatrical apparitions appearing on major Northwest stages this summer.
But the Sigmund Freuds, Carl Jungs and Sabina Spielreins aren't game players.
Bryher would soon become a patron of the International Psycho-analytical Press and the Viennese Psycho-Analytical Society as well as a friend and protector of the Freuds.
The Freuds perhaps would have done the same, except that Sigmund Freud's daughter and heiress apparent to the psychoanalytical mantle was detained by the Gestapo and questioned for one whole day.
Said's Freud and the Non-European is an attempt to read Freud's Moses and Monotheism in the light of contemporary israeliPalestinian politics.