Frederick III

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Frederick III

n
1. (Biography) 1415–93, Holy Roman Emperor (1452–93) and, as Frederick IV, king of Germany (1440–93)
2. (Biography) called the Wise. 1463–1525, elector of Saxony (1486–1525). He protected Martin Luther in Wartburg Castle after the Diet of Worms (1521)
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References in periodicals archive ?
On the basis of the style of the stove tile and the historical facts described above, the first Saxon elector whose coat of arms could be depicted on the stove tile is Friedrich III, who held the electoral title in 1486-1525.
(A standing Friedrich III fared less well and was lost during the Battle of Berlin in 1945- Two replica bronzes were cast in 1972.) Schluter's most renowned architectural project was his work at Stadtschloss, the palace in the northern baroque style.
Brandenburg and Emperor Friedrich III, rather than at the nature of court life itself.
The Princess married Friedrich III of Prussia, who died in 1888.
1672-75), through the more extravagant cultural agenda of Friedrich III (r.
Married to the German Emperor Friedrich III, Princess Victoria - the German Empress - only outlived her mother, who died in 1901, by a few months.
She presents Emperor Charles IV's use of the personal memoir to legitimize his claim to the empire over Ludwig of Bavaria; Friedrich III's account of the political upheavals in the early years of his reign when much of Austria, Bohemia, and Hungary were wrenched from his control; the famed memoirs of the noblewoman Helene Kottanner and her apologia of the disputed rule of Ladislaus Postumus in Hungary; and Maximilian l's fragmentary records of his claim to the Hapsburg throne.
On 18 January 1701, Friedrich III, hitherto Elector of Brandenburg, had himself crowned Friedrich I of Prussia and thereby established the new kingdom.
The foremost authority on Wilhelmian Germany and an unsurpassed historical detective, Rohl has drawn extensively on a number of archives, particularly on the Archiv der Hessischen Hausstiftung, Schloss Fasanerie, for the papers of the Crown Prince Friedrich Wilhelm, later Kaiser Friedrich III, and Crown Princess Victoria, later Kaiserin Victoria; the Royal Archives in Windsor, for the papers of Queen Victoria among others; and the former Deutsches Zentrales Staatsarchiv II in Merseburg, for the papers of Count Alfred von Waldersee, having demonstrated that the published edition of his papers by Heinrich Otto von Meisner is unreliable.
(1) While this article illustrates how Beger's achievements and rise within society resulted from the patronage of four different princes, Karl Ludwig (1617-80), and Karl II (1651-85), Electors of the Pfalz, and the Great Elector (1620-88) and his son, Friedrich III of Brandenburg (1657-1713), I also highlight the pressures that were brought to bear on a servant of princes at this time.
(4) Cited in Werner Richter, Friedrich III: Leben und tragik des Zweiten Hohenzollern Kaisers (Munich, 1981), 56.