turnverein

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turn·ver·ein

 (tûrn′və-rīn′, to͝orn′-)
n. Sports
A club of gymnasts or tumblers.

[German : turnen, to do gymnastics; see turner2 + Verein, club (from obsolete vereine, back-formation from Middle High German vereinen, to unite : ver-, intensive pref. from Old High German far-; see per in Indo-European roots + einen, to make one, from ein, one, from Old High German; see oi-no- in Indo-European roots).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

turn•ver•ein

(ˈtɜrn vəˌraɪn, -fə-, ˈtʊərn-)

n.
an athletic club, esp. of gymnasts.
[1850–55, Amer.; < German: gymnastic club =turn(en) to practice gymnastics (see turner2) + Verein union]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.turnverein - a club of tumblers or gymnaststurnverein - a club of tumblers or gymnasts  
gild, guild, social club, society, club, lodge, order - a formal association of people with similar interests; "he joined a golf club"; "they formed a small lunch society"; "men from the fraternal order will staff the soup kitchen today"
turner - a tumbler who is a member of a turnverein
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
After the Battle of Jena, young people formed Turnerschaften (gymnastic societies) under the tutelage of the ardent nationalist Friedrich Ludwig Jahn. Jahn, a key figure in investing the German nation with martial values, intended these societies to prepare young men for a future military uprising against Napoleon by the physical conditioning of their bodies.
The newly-installed surface at the Friedrich Ludwig Jahn Stadium, laid on a polythene base on top of an artificial athletics track, was narrow in the turns and disconcertingly uneven in patches.