Friese-Greene


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Friese-Greene

(ˌfriːzˈɡriːn)
n
(Biography) William. 1855–1921, British photographer. He invented (with Mortimer Evans) the first practicable motion-picture camera
References in periodicals archive ?
A chronicle of William Friese-Greene's life, the inventor of the first cinematic camera (1951) ***
Described as 'An exhibition of the stunning single and multi colour 3D holograms of Inaki Beguiristain', it will be at the Friese-Greene Gallery at the Brighton Media Centre from May 3rd to June 1st 2014, with free admission.
Long before the internet, Britain invented the electric telegraph, the penny post, the fax machine, the still camera (Fox-Talbot) and the movie camera (Friese-Greene), the telephone (Bell was a Scot!), radio, television, fibre optics, radar, the computer (Turing) and the worldwide web (Tim Berners-Lee).
TELECOMWORLDWIRE-October 19, 2011-SES names Niclas Friese-Greene as SVP of Marketing and Corporate Communications(C)1994-2011 M2 COMMUNICATIONS http://www.m2.com
TV QUIZ 1 Friese-Greene; 2 Dave Tucker; 3 Kermit The Frog; 4 The Stretch; 5 Camberwick Green.
Things picked up in the 1890s, when British Film Pioneer William Friese-Greene filed a patent for a 3-D movie process (two projectors and a stereoscope to converge the images).
Following the success of What the Industrial Revolution Did for Us, Around the World in 80 Treasures and the recent Lost World of Friese-Greene, he returns with a new series tracing the roots of Modernism.
Claude Friese-Greene called his epic The Open Road - and it was filmed using a colour photography system of his own invention which he hoped to sell to Hollywood, bringing colour films to mass audiences for the first time.
These all come from the work of film-maker Claude Friese-Greene, who compiled a travelogue of the UK between 1924 and 1925, and paid Cardiff a visit along his trail.
HAVING recently wallowed in the wonderful nostalgia provided by the old Mitchell and Kenyon films, we can now enter The Lost World of Friese-Greene (BBC2, Tuesday).
Among their subsequent works were "The Magic Box" (1951), an all-star tribute to motion picture inventor William Friese-Greene; the war actioner "Sailor of the King" (aka "Single-Handed"); "Run for the Sun"; "Private's Progress"; the Kingsley Amis satire of academia "Lucky Jim"; and the highly successful Peter Sellers comedies "The Man in a Cocked Hat" ("Carlton-Browne of the F.O."), "I'm All Right Jack" and "Heavens Above!"