frigate

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frig·ate

 (frĭg′ĭt)
n.
1. A warship that is smaller than a destroyer and used primarily for escort duty.
2. A high-speed, medium-sized sailing war vessel of the 1600s, 1700s, and 1800s.
3. Obsolete A fast, light vessel, such as a sailboat.

[French frégate, from Italian fregata.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

frigate

(ˈfrɪɡɪt)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) a medium-sized square-rigged warship of the 18th and 19th centuries
2. (Nautical Terms)
a. Brit a warship larger than a corvette and smaller than a destroyer
b. US (formerly) a warship larger than a destroyer and smaller than a cruiser
c. US a small escort vessel
[C16: from French frégate, from Italian fregata, of unknown origin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

frig•ate

(ˈfrɪg ɪt)

n.
1. a fast naval vessel of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, generally having a lofty ship rig and being heavily armed on one or two decks.
2. a modern warship.
[1575–85; < Middle French frégate < Italian fregata, Sicilian fragata]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.frigate - a medium size square-rigged warship of the 18th and 19th centuriesfrigate - a medium size square-rigged warship of the 18th and 19th centuries
combat ship, war vessel, warship - a government ship that is available for waging war
2.frigate - a United States warship larger than a destroyer and smaller than a cruiser
guided missile frigate - a frigate that carries guided missiles
combat ship, war vessel, warship - a government ship that is available for waging war
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

frigate

[ˈfrɪgɪt] N (Naut) → fragata f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

frigate

[ˈfrɪgət] n (modern)frégate f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

frigate

n (Naut) → Fregatte f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

frigate

[ˈfrɪgɪt] n (Naut) → fregata
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Until further information, therefore, I shall maintain it to be a sea-unicorn of colossal dimensions, armed not with a halberd, but with a real spur, as the armoured frigates, or the `rams' of war, whose massiveness and motive power it would possess at the same time.
A frigate of great speed, the Abraham Lincoln, was put in commission as soon as possible.
One bright afternoon, a gig, gaily bedizened with streamers, was observed to shove off from the side of one of the French frigates, and pull directly for our gangway.
frigate Essex, in the Pacific, during the late War', is said to contain some interesting particulars concerning the islanders.
--Giving a party to the last arrived harpooneers, I dare say, gay as a frigate's pennant, and so am I--fa, la!
A brilliant frigate captain, a man of sound judgment, of dashing bravery and of serene mind, scrupulously concerned for the welfare and honour of the navy, he missed a larger fame only by the chances of the service.
Conclusion.--The Certificate.--The French Settlements.--The Post of Medina.--The Basilic.--Saint Louis.--The English Frigate.--The Return to London.
It might be thought they were about to board a frigate and to fight a crew superior in number to their own, not to attempt the capture of a canoe manned by four people.
Where unrecorded names and navies rust, and untold hopes and anchors rot; where in her murderous hold this frigate earth is ballasted with bones of millions of the drowned; there, in that awful water-land, there was thy most familiar home.
Why, good woman, I’ve been off there in the Boadishey frigate, when you could see nothing but some such matter as a piece of sky, mayhap, as big as the main sail; and then again, there was a hole under your lee-quarter big enough to hold the whole British navy.”
ON the eighth of September, 1810, the Tonquin put to sea, where she was soon joined by the frigate Constitution.
I knew that we should either go to the bottom together, or that she would be the making of me; and I never had two days of foul weather all the time I was at sea in her; and after taking privateers enough to be very entertaining, I had the good luck in my passage home the next autumn, to fall in with the very French frigate I wanted.