Frink


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Frink

(frɪŋk)
n
(Biography) Dame Elisabeth. 1930–93, British sculptor
References in periodicals archive ?
Elisabeth Frink: Catalogue Raisonne of Sculpture 1947-93
Henry James famously said that the work of the novelist was to create the sense of "felt life." In this catalogue raisonne, essays by Julian Spalding, former curator of the Glasgow Museums, and Arie Hartog, director of the Gerhard-Marcks-Haus in Bremen, argue that it is the "living presence" of Frink's sculpture--a consciousness embodied in bronze very like James's "felt life"--that made her both popular with the public and, at the same time, largely irrelevant to the art establishment in her native Britain.
Elisabeth Frink (1930-94) was a figural sculptor who came of age in the 1950s, becoming as well known for her generous personality and her life as the doyenne of Woolland, a country house and studio in rural Dorset, as for her accessible sculpture, drawings, and prints.
One is reminded of Louise Bourgeois, although (unlike Bourgeois) Frink never revealed her secret traumas to the public.
On July 30, President Bush announced the recess appointment of Albert Frink Jr.
On July 22, the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation approved the nomination of Frink to serve as Assistant Secretary of Manufacturing and Services.
In 1974, Frink co-founded Fabrica International, which develops, manufactures and sells high-end luxury carpet and is rated the No.1 carpet mill in the U.S.
Throughout much of her career, Antoinette Frink was an anomaly.
But today, Frink is inmate #61900-061, and both the success and respect she once knew are distant memories.
"I'm cautiously optimistic," says Frink. "I know it's a hard thing to have happen.
Evans of the Bush Administration's intention to nominate Al Frink for the position of assistant secretary of manufacturing and services.
As the assistant secretary, Frink will advocate, coordinate and implement policies that will help U.S.