Frisian

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Related to Frisians: Greater Frisia

Fri·sian

 (frĭzh′ən, frē′zhən) also Frie·sian (frē′zhən)
n.
1. A native or inhabitant of the Frisian Islands or Friesland.
2. The West Germanic language of the Frisians. It is the language most closely related to English.

[From Latin Frīsiī, the Frisians, of Germanic origin.]

Fri′sian adj.

Frisian

(ˈfrɪʒən) or

Friesian

n
1. (Languages) a language spoken in the NW Netherlands, parts of N Germany, and adjacent islands, belonging to the West Germanic branch of the Indo-European family: the nearest relative of the English language; it has three main dialects
2. (Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Friesland or a speaker of the Frisian language
3. (Languages) a native or inhabitant of Friesland or a speaker of the Frisian language
adj
4. (Languages) of or relating to the Frisian language or its speakers
5. (Peoples) of or relating to the Frisian language or its speakers
6. (Placename) of or relating to Friesland or its peoples and culture
7. (Languages) of or relating to Friesland or its peoples and culture
8. (Peoples) of or relating to Friesland or its peoples and culture
[C16: from Latin Frīsiī people of northern Germany]

Fri•sian

(ˈfrɪʒ ən, ˈfri ʒən)

also Friesian



n.
1. a member of a people of the North Sea coast.
2. the West Germanic language of the Frisians.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to Friesland, the Frisians, or the language Frisian.
[1590–1600; < Latin Frisi(ī) the people of a Germanic tribe]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Frisian - a native or inhabitant of Friesland or Frisia
Dutch, Dutch people - the people of the Netherlands; "the Dutch are famous for their tulips"
2.Frisian - a West Germanic language spoken in Friesland in the northwestern Netherlands; a near relative of English
West Germanic, West Germanic language - a branch of the Germanic languages
Old Frisian - the Frisian language until the 16th century; the Germanic language of ancient Frisia
Adj.1.Frisian - of or relating to the people or culture or language of Friesland or Frisia
Translations
frisafriso
friisiläinen
FriesFriese
frisisk
frisfrisiska

Frisian

[ˈfrɪʒən]
A. ADJfrisio
B. N
1. (= person) → frisio/a m/f
2. (Ling) → frisio m
C. CPD the Frisian Islands NPLlas Islas Frisias
References in classic literature ?
Ten yards farther on, John de Witt met a lovely young girl, of about seventeen or eighteen, dressed in the national costume of the Frisian women, who, with pretty demureness, dropped a curtesy to him.
In the late first millennia, when the rest of Europe was isolating itself, the Frisians opened up trade routes dormant since the days of Rome, and Pye even credits them with reinventing money.
However, even when they used to regularly meet it was Heerenveen who usually came out on top - they have lost only 14 of the 56 previous meetings - and it was once again the The Super Frisians who won the reverse fixture 2-1 in a game which produced seven yellow cards.
In succeeding centuries, the descendants scatter all over the world, often in danger of their lives, while their blood gets intermingled with that of Frisians, Native Americans, and African Americans.
Among the garrisons of the 1,000-soldier fort were the Tungrians, a Germanic tribe from Belgium and Holland, and the Frisians, from eastern Holland.
Native Irish breeds such as the Hereford Cow, Angus, Short Horn and Frisians are quite pleasant and friendly by nature.
But we were saved from the plastering suffered by the North Frisians of Germany, who capitulated 21-2 to the Croats in Serbia, 19-0 to the Catalans in Spain, and an eye-watering 46-1 to the Roma in Hungary.
Better would be for them to diversify, as the Frisians in the Netherlands had to do from declining dairy into cash crops like wheat and beans.
Because of the importance of the martyr songs in the sixteenth-century era of persecution, and because the Frisians and Flemish outnumbered the Waterlanders (perhaps by three to one), Gregory intends through republication of these "forgotten writings" to enrich the scholarship on Mennonite martyrology, which has up to now been focused too exclusively on Van Braght's Martyr's Mirror.
The English and Frisians studied had almost identical genetic make-up.