frontiersman

(redirected from Frontiersmen)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

fron·tiers·man

 (frŭn-tîrz′mən)
n.
A man who lives on the frontier.

frontiersman

(ˈfrʌntɪəzmən; frʌnˈtɪəz-)
n, pl -men
(formerly) a man living on a frontier, esp in a newly pioneered territory of the US

fron•tiers•man

(frʌnˈtɪərz mən, frɒn-; esp. Brit. ˈfrʌn tɪərz-)

n., pl. -men.
a person who lives on a frontier.
[1775–85, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.frontiersman - a man who lives on the frontierfrontiersman - a man who lives on the frontier  
pioneer - one the first colonists or settlers in a new territory; "they went west as pioneers with only the possessions they could carry with them"
Translations

frontiersman

[frʌnˈtɪəzmən] N (frontiersmen (pl)) → hombre m de la frontera

frontiersman

[ˈfrʌntɪəzmən] npioniere m
References in classic literature ?
"The fact that a band of 6,000 Indians are now murdering our frontiersmen at their impudent leisure, and that we are only able to send 1,200 soldiers against them, is utilized here to discourage emigration to America.
But a group of five stood upright, backwoodsmen and frontiersmen, they, eager to contest any
Legendary frontiersmen Davy Crockett and Jim Bowie both died in the 12-day battle.
The press even attacked his mother, who had died when he was only 14 years old, leaving him an orphan alone on the frontier--alone but for the other frontiersmen. Jackson was always at home with them.
The public can take a step back in time and visit teepees and tents and visit with the Prairieland Frontiersmen on Saturday, Oct.
The new owner, entrepreneur Pearse Quinn wants the remaining frontiersmen off so that he can restart the ill-fated project with a clean slate.
They were the frontiersmen, gunslingers and entrepreneurs who inhabited America's Wild West - but many of the United States' most famous sons can trace their ancestors back to Wales, a new book claims.
Clark Company's outstanding Western Frontiersmen series, "This Far-Off Wild Land: The Upper Missouri Letters of Andrew Dawson" is a 336 page biographical compendium featuring original correspondences of a young man of 24 years who, in the mid-1800s, found himself far from his home in Scotland and working for the American Fur Company on the upper Missouri River.
A IN the days of the backwoodsmen, frontiersmen and trappers of the 18th century when Americans were pushing west and trading with native Americans, the going rate for a buckskin was one silver dollar.
At 70 paces, frontiersmen would "snuff the candle" or "drive the nail." In the former, the lead ball from the rifle would have to pass through the flame of a burning candle, blowing out the flame but striking neither wick nor candle, in the latter contest of marksmanship, the lead ball would have to strike the head of a nail and drive it farther into a post.
That and images of stubbly Desperate Dan-like rugged frontiersmen whose chins were used to light matches and who caught bullets between their teeth for a laugh.
In this new biography of Daniel Boone, one of America's best-known frontiersmen, the author, a Harvard-trained attorney and descendent of prominent Kentucky pioneers, seeks to debunk the myths about his subject.