Frozenness


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Fro´zen`ness


n.1.A state of being frozen.
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The central characteristic of this brand of masochism, I propose, is its suspense, its frozenness, its waiting.
A standout story, "Ice Flowers," features emotional frozenness in the face of too many griefs.
I listen for mice in the walls, scurrying down the pipes of old houses like these, for the hiss of furnace heat kicking on and off, and the laugh track of my parents' television, the old 1950s sitcoms my mother falls asleep to, the calm frozenness of that black and white world comforting her.
Internalizing responses include sense of being overwhelmed and intruded upon, blanking out, deleting, blunting response, Intrusive thoughts of fragments of abuse recollected, Flashbacks resulting in Anxiety, Panic disorder, frozenness, Avoidance of people, places, things that remind of abuse and Clinging to 'safe' figures including the abuser.
Many a time, the local people themselves internalize their fixity and frozenness as advocated by rights groups and activists.
Instead of opting for emotional frozenness (Tatum, 2008), Christy forges emotionally deeper to critique her own Whiteness by stating, "I thought I was in the know but I have yet to be exposed." As the preceding comment was about her lack of understanding of race, her acknowledgement of this lack of understanding both critiques her education and the hegemonic Whiteness embedded in her education.
Begin with fingers and/ or toes and let the wiggling gradually expand to thaw out the frozenness in the rest of the body.
According to literature that seemed to describe the therapeutic frozenness I experienced with Amy, there are some patients who tightly insulate their emotional selves as if behind a shell or wall (Barrows, 1999; Mitrani, 2001).
In this case the ticking sound of the watch--objective, neutral, "out there"--is made to match the Subject's figurative frozenness, which suggests lack of concern or indifference.
"My male patients love it because it gets rid of their forehead lines without the telltale frozenness of Botox, Dysport, Xeomin."
Some of the basic criteria for an expression to be considered an idiom are their non-compositionality (Fernando and Flavell 1981) and frozenness or fixedness (Grant and Bauer 2004).