ripening

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rip·en

 (rī′pən)
tr. & intr.v. rip·ened, rip·en·ing, rip·ens
To make or become ripe or riper; mature.

rip′en·er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ripening - coming to full developmentripening - coming to full development; becoming mature
biological process, organic process - a process occurring in living organisms
2.ripening - acquiring desirable qualities by being left undisturbed for some timeripening - acquiring desirable qualities by being left undisturbed for some time
mellowing - the process of becoming mellow
biological process, organic process - a process occurring in living organisms
Translations

rip·en·ing

n. reblandecimiento, dilatación tal como la del cuello uterino durante el parto.
References in periodicals archive ?
Director General Punjab Food Authority Captain (r) Muhammad Usman Younis said in an interview to a private TV channel that their department has banned the use of calcium carbide as fruit ripening agent since 2017 but fruit sellers have not taken it seriously and its high time now.
The palm fruit in the garden is so famous that people look forward to its fruit ripening up all year round.
Fruit ripening may be prolonged if the weather is cool.Another indicator for fruit maturity is that a hole appears inside the cavity of the fruit.
The fruit vendors then use a hazardous fruit ripening agent, Calcium carbide or "pattas", to speed up the ripening process.
The fruit vendors then use a hazardous fruit ripening agent, Calcium carbide or 'pattas', to speed up the ripening process.
Dutch ripening technology specialist Interko launched Optimo, a pre-assembled ripening room and "entrylevel option" for operators looking to venture into the fruit ripening business for the first time.
At present, researchers are on the process of testing a safer alternative source of ethylene for fruit ripening which was initially developed in the University of Queensland.
They said that use of ethylene for fruit ripening purposes was not harmful for human consumption, but these compounds are quite expensive hence developing countries use low cost calcium carbide, which is harmful and has many disadvantages compared to ethylene.
Mr Sunday Amos, a nutritionist, said that calcium carbide used to support fruit ripening releases acetylene when mixed with water.
I could almost smell the fruit ripening in the summer heat and feel myself snapping clusters of grapes from beneath broad leaves.
In general, an increase in ethylene production acts as a trigger of fruit ripening, inducing the autocatalytic production that causes changes in color, texture, aroma, flavor, and other biochemical, physiological and physical attributes of the fruit (HIWASA-TANASE and EZURA, 2014) that the consumer consider important for its acquisition.