Fuegian

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Fuegian

(fjuːˈiːdʒɪən; ˈfweɪdʒ-)
adj
(Placename) of or relating to Tierra del Fuego or its indigenous Indians
n
(Peoples) an Indian of Tierra del Fuego
References in classic literature ?
'The aborigines of the Andaman Islands may perhaps claim the distinction of being the smallest race upon this earth, though some anthropologists prefer the Bushmen of Africa, the Digger Indians of America, and the Terra del Fuegians. The average height is rather below four feet, although many full-grown adults may be found who are very much smaller than this.
The men were a tall, fine race, yet it was afterwards easy to see in the Fuegian savage the same countenance rendered hideous by cold, want of food, and less civilization.
Further rehabilitation of Darwin the geologist and paleontologist has been provided by Richard Darwin Keynes, in Fossils, Finches and Fuegians (2003), a thorough account of the voyage of the Beagle; and by Sandra Herbert, in Charles Darwin, Geologist (2005), which examines many facets of Darwin's development as a scientific observer and communicator.
While Darwin is able to enjoy the "free scope given to the imagination" by granite, or forests not "serviceable to mankind," the Fuegians, dependent on those rocks and forests for their very existence, do not have the luxury of such contemplation.
Yet, today, from the Fuegians living in the subantarctic region to tribes living in Africa, at least a small part of the body needs to be covered in general social interactions (Warren 1933).
The time spent with the young Yamana builds a friendship between the two young men and allows Jack to see Jemmy beyond preconceptions about native Fuegians, which, years later, allows him to integrate Jemmy Button in order to formulate a story that opposes civilization.
Furlong, Charles 1917 "Tribal Distribution And Settlements Of The Fuegians, Comprising Nomenclature, Etymology, Philology, And Populations", Geographical Review, No.
Tierra del Fuego and the Fuegians, now extinct, fascinated Darwin and clearly impressed him deeply.
The vegetation is snarled, dense, and impenetrable; the native Fuegians appear as a blend of strange characteristics, astonishing, wild, and savage.
In 1892, Slocum, exhausted from sleepless nights while he kept guard against barefooted Fuegians in canoes, spread tacks on his deck on the basis that 'one cannot step on a tack without saying something about it'.
The Fuegians rank amongst the lowest barbarians; but I was continually struck with surprise how closely the three natives on board H.M.S.