fugue

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Related to Fuge: Foge, Fugue state

fugue

 (fyo͞og)
n.
1. Music A contrapuntal musical composition whose basic structure consists of a theme or themes stated successively in different voices.
2. Psychiatry A dissociative state, usually caused by trauma, marked by sudden travel or wandering away from home and an inability to remember one's past.

[Italian fuga (influenced by French fugue, from Italian fuga), from Latin, flight.]

fu′gal (fyo͞o′gəl) adj.
fu′gal·ly adv.
fugue v.
fugu′ist (fyo͞o′gĭst) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fugue

(fjuːɡ)
n
1. (Classical Music) a musical form consisting essentially of a theme repeated a fifth above or a fourth below the continuing first statement
2. (Psychiatry) psychiatry a dreamlike altered state of consciousness, lasting from a few hours to several days, during which a person loses his or her memory for his or her previous life and often wanders away from home
[C16: from French, from Italian fuga, from Latin: a running away, flight]
ˈfugueˌlike adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fugue

(fyug)

n.
1. a polyphonic composition based upon one, two, or more themes, which are enunciated by several voices or parts in turn, subjected to contrapuntal treatment.
2. a period of amnesia during which the affected person seems to be conscious and to make rational decisions: upon recovery, the period is not remembered.
[1590–1600; < French < Italian fuga < Latin: flight]
fugue′like`, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

fugue

A composition of many parts on a short theme and using counterpoint.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fugue - dissociative disorder in which a person forgets who they are and leaves home to creates a new life; during the fugue there is no memory of the former life; after recovering there is no memory for events during the dissociative state
dissociative disorder - dissociation so severe that the usually integrated functions of consciousness and perception of self break down
2.fugue - a dreamlike state of altered consciousness that may last for hours or days
mental condition, mental state, psychological condition, psychological state - (psychology) a mental condition in which the qualities of a state are relatively constant even though the state itself may be dynamic; "a manic state"
3.fugue - a musical form consisting of a theme repeated a fifth above or a fourth below its first statement
classical, classical music, serious music - traditional genre of music conforming to an established form and appealing to critical interest and developed musical taste
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

fugue

[fjuːg] Nfuga f
FULBRIGHT
Las becas Fulbright son concedidas por el gobierno de Estados Unidos a licenciados nacionales y extranjeros con el fin de facilitar la ampliación de estudios y el acceso a la investigación o la enseñanza dentro del país. Miles de personas se han beneficiado de estas becas desde que se introdujo el programa Fulbright en 1946, como parte de la legislación establecida por el senador J. William Fulbright, un hombre de estado demócrata con gran experiencia en política exterior.
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

fugue

[ˈfjuːg] nfugue f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

fugue

n (Mus) → Fuge f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

fugue

[fjuːg] n (Mus) → fuga
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
The fuge, late, tace of the Carthusian brother is my motto here, my death to the world is the life of this canton, my prayer takes the form of the active work to which I have set my hand, and which I love--the work of sowing the seeds of happiness and joy, of giving to others what I myself have not.
Mr Fuge estimated the speed at "130mph-plus" and said he believed he saw the driver have a "loss of concentration".
Dr Fuge, who was the charity's chair of trustees between 2005 and 2017, has a wide range of experiences in the health service and the voluntary sector.
Fuge, of Gorsey Lane, Wallasey, admitted having a fetish for crossdressing and that his sex life with his wife suffered when she became ill.
Fuge struck 55 runs for the visitors, while Matthew Mason contributing 38 runs as Gowerton reached 186-9 off their allotted overs, with Phil Owen claiming six of the wickets.
Up-and-coming soprano Keri Fuge is also building a stellar reputation.
Passacaglia und Fuge for two horns by Michael Holtzel.
Hill: 6-4 Al Kazeem, 7-2 The Fuge, 4 Declaration of War, 5-1 Mukhadram, 11-2 Mars, 8 Pastorius, 33 Miblish.
Tony Fuge (LMRCA), Brian Lindley (Bilton), David Blackmore (Stratford) and Immediate Past President Gareth Willcock got off to an excellent start, reaching five ends 11-1 up.
The 24-place fuge can spin up to 21,130 x g and accurately cool tc set temperatures from -10 to +40 C.
The WKCR marathon customarily concludes with the Kunst der Fuge, the Art of the Fugue, whose conclusion is the profoundly moving unfinished fugue, revealing at the end of a marathon that the great Johann Sebastian Bach has died (yet again).