Fugger

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Fug·ger

 (fo͝og′ər)
Family of German financiers who exerted great economic and political influence in the 1400s and 1500s. Founded by Johannes (1348-1409), the family business was greatly expanded by his son Jakob (died 1469).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Fugger

(German ˈfʊɡər)
n
(Biography) a German family of merchants and bankers, prominent in 15th- and 16th-century Europe
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
He repeatedly travelled to Augsburg to work for the Fugger family. On several occasions, the city council had to resolve problems relating to him and his brother Hans Leo that pertained to the lending of money at high interest.
Durer had a close relationship with Augsburg and the Fugger family. Durer had been a friend and was patronised by the Fugger family for many years.
By 1587 he had moved to Munich to work for the ultra-Catholic Bavarian court and, from 1589, for the cosmopolitan Fugger family in Augsburg.
Their imperial loans would in the end bankrupt the Fugger family. Cranach and the other leading citizens are known to have felt the utmost despondency, but Sibylle - now turned soldier, and a better soldier than her husband - defended the town staunchly amid the derangement of all her expectations.
A name you will come across frequently while walking Augsburg's streets is the Fugger family. The family threw up some of Europe's major bankers in the 15th and 16th century.
In July 1526 Matthaus Schwarz, a 29-year-old chief accountant for the mighty Fugger family of merchants from Augsburg, commissioned a naked image of himself as fashionably slim and precisely noted his waist measurements.
A series of five appendices trace first editions printed by Gardano in the 1560s, Gardano prints in the libraries of the Fugger family of Augsburg (perhaps the most famous Northern collectors of music at the time), books financed by Gardano, publications of Antonio Gardano available in 1591, and general descriptions of binder's copies ("collections of printed books bound together under one cover in a single volume" [19]).
These included Hans Heinrich Herwart (1520-1583), most of whose collection was purchased in 1585 and 1594 by Duke Wilhelm V of Bavaria and is now found in the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Munich; (7) Johann Jakob Fugger (1516-1575), whose collection passed into the hands of his patron, Duke Albrecht V of Bavaria, and is now located in the same library; (8) three other members of the Fugger family, Raimund (1528-1569), his brother Georg (1518-1569), and the latter's son, Philipp Eduard (1546-1618), whose collections eventually came to reside in the Osterreichische Nationalbibliothek, Vienna; (9) and Marcus Welser the younger (1558-1614), whose music collection is now found in libraries in Augsburg and Regensburg.