Fugger

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Fug·ger

 (fo͝og′ər)
Family of German financiers who exerted great economic and political influence in the 1400s and 1500s. Founded by Johannes (1348-1409), the family business was greatly expanded by his son Jakob (died 1469).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Fugger

(German ˈfʊɡər)
n
(Biography) a German family of merchants and bankers, prominent in 15th- and 16th-century Europe
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
When Kuran tells us that some European financiers were enormously rich, he also tells us that one famous example, the Fuggers, grew by marriage.
Most probably, Andrea Gabrieli mediated for the young artist a contact to the Fuggers, a family of prominent businessmen and bankers, in Augsburg.
Tirpitz tried by various publicist ventures to remind the nation of past naval legacies, those of the Vikings and the Hansa, of the Welsers and Fuggers, of Jacob of Courland and the Great Elector.
Igualmente sobre los comerciantes Fucares o Fuggers (3: 427n214), en donde de modo muy temprano se critica la administracion de la Casa de Austria, que estima se mejora con la de Borbon.
The Fuggers of Augsburg; pursuing wealth and honor in Renaissance Germany.
Although he still owed the Augsburg bankers, the Fuggers, several thousand ducats for the bribes he had dispensed for his election as Emperor, he was able to obtain ample funds for the prosecution of the Schmalkaldic War.
The Fuggers even created a unique medieval social housing project.
'The Welsers and the Fuggers, German banking families, lent Charles V a lot of the money which helped him bribe the electors of the Holy Roman Empire.
Other excellent interdisciplinary chapters include Gerhild Scholz Williams's account of sermons and tracts written as part of the persecution of witches and Jill Bepler's insights into book-collecting and libraries--the Fuggers of Augsburg, when they hit hard times, for example, had to sell 11,000 printed books to Duke Albrecht of Bavaria.