perfect rhyme

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Related to Full rhymes: Exact rhymes

perfect rhyme

n.
1. Rhyme in which the final accented vowel and all succeeding consonants or syllables are identical, while the preceding consonants are different, for example, great, late; rider, beside her; dutiful, unbeautiful. Also called full rhyme, true rhyme.
2. Rime riche.

perfect rhyme

n
1. (Poetry) Also called: full rhyme rhyme between words in which the stressed vowels and any succeeding consonants are identical although the consonants preceding the stressed vowels may be different, as between part/hart or believe/conceive
2. (Poetry) a rhyme between two words that are pronounced the same although differing in meaning, as in bough/bow
Translations

perfect rhyme

References in periodicals archive ?
The poets mostly wrote metrical verses with full rhymes. The major literary influences were French, German, English and Russian.
Harris with very few exceptions uses full rhymes which are resonant and plain.
While composing in full rhymes is difficult in Estonian, and often disappointing, it is, however, in a way even easier for a translator to render such verse into regularly rhymed English.
In this short poem, the rhythms of colloquial speech are deftly deployed against full rhymes and half-rhymes ("bar/beer, hours/bars") giving the poem the punch of a holiday postcard.
It not only end-rhymes "bright" and "tonight" but also rhymes the first sounds of "bright" with "bridal" in the middle of the second line, and half-rhymes "cool" with "fall" in the middles of the first and third lines, and half-rhymes the open vowels ending "day" and "so" and "dew" and "thou" with the full rhymes on open vowels of "sky" and "die" (and "thy").
Certain vowels and consonants are sounded again and again without being brought into full rhyme: whirring, turn, leathery, work, winter, weather, there, grandfather, horse, whirr, thresher, showers, morning; and stillness, fistful, whistles; whirr, stillness, whistles; lamp-hung, lank, leathery; leathery, all-weather; coasting, goatee; and other repeated phonemes.
(The three-syllable dactylic rhymes, unusual in somber poems, seem especially sleep-laden: yew-berries, mysteries, drowsily.) Most striking, a train of thought-through-sound leads us from an owl to the melancholy soul in danger of self-destruction, and leaves the owl presiding, in its line-final position (literally) over the soul, perhaps becoming the soul: the limitations of typography almost prevent me from marking all the phonetic figures here: from "Downy owl" to "sorrow" to "Drowsily" to "Drown" to "soul." (Perhaps Keats's pronunciation made "owl" and "soul" a full rhyme.) The train of thought brings together mythological associations of the owl, the cry of pain in that repeated "ow" (!), and the sensations and state of melancholy or depression.
Four irregular beats to a line, sometimes three in a row as in "mauve-blue sky," full rhymes and half-rhymes in tetrameters, most lines contain consonantal resonances within them, and a final couplet unexpectedly not echoing its sounds, although "dream" echoes "time," and "alone" echoes "station," "intention," and "companion." Of course, these subtleties perform their work mostly in the reader's subconscious mind, but isn't it impressive to find this much conscious art on the part of a poet?
In fact Lazamon's full rhymes increase as he advances, and his para-rhyme forms a major, not compensatory, element in his sound-linkage.
The music of his poems has a gaudy energy sparked by full rhymes, end-stopped lines and rhythms out of Dr.
Although Milton's extensive deployment of enjambment generally tends to diminish the aural force of contiguous partial rhymes (or even full rhymes), there are exceptions:
Two sets of full rhymes ("me"/"thee"/"degree" and "Eyes"/"despise") are interlaced, with the "I" of line 873 hovering phonemically between as a partial rhyme to both sets.